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Gwendolyn | 3 weeks ago
To Start Out I Had A Jack Russell And Our Neighbor Had A Great Dane. My …

to start out I had a Jack Russell and our neighbor had a great dane. My Jack had gotten bitten by the great dane, so my vet was short of staff so I had to get him to a vet, well the neighbor called their vet and they said bring him in.This was a Wed, around 5 pm. Jack had a rip on the right shoulder and marks on his elbows. They stitch Jack up and put a drain tube in.They tell me to bring him back Monday to take out the tube, Ok now this is the following day, Thur. and I call and tell them Jack is not eating or drinking and He smells really bad.They say bring him in and that was 10 am and he was there till 7 pm. We get in the car to go home and I tell my boyfriend that he still smells bad. Well Fri. comes and I just baby Jack.Then Fri. comes and I call the vet and tell them Jack is not getting better and he still smells bad. They say bring him in, this was Sat., ok 3rd time to this vet and guess what she comes out and shows us his left shoulder that’s shaved and all black with a cut that was the smelly that I smelled for 3 days. I asked her why they didn’t see that and her reply was, are you ready for this?? Why didn’t You see it?? wth, I am NOT a vet I told her and after I told them on day 2 they should’ve found something??? We took Jack home and he was so uncomfortable that we took him to another vet at 5 am Sunday morning. They knew Jack was not doing good, they couldn’t find his blood pressure and then they found one at 18,she told us it should be 80.We left and was told if he was stable they would do a transfusion and we said whatever it takes.We get a call later saying he is not getting better so we went to see him and he was so weak and it just broke our heart to do what we had to do.We brought Jack home and buried him.
My advice to everyone if this happens get your friend shaved so this is not over looked. We miss this little guy every day and I know some people think we are nuts But his was our everything. The big kicker is no vet wants to help us because vets are their friends, Well if you are a vet for our friends you should help with anything that went wrong if not you are not a vet that cares about our friends and I think that is awful.

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Kate | 1 year ago
I Live In A Studio Apartment With Two Female Cats (ages 1.5 & 5) And When I’m …

I live in a studio apartment with two female cats (ages 1.5 & 5) and when I’m not in the apartment, they get along fine. During the day if I’m home, they only compete when they are hungry. But all of a sudden between 12am and 1am if I’m home, they start to chase each other to the point of some scary yowels. I can only assume it’s jealousy-triggered. My question is, how do I mitigate the fighting if i can only separate them between a cold bathroom and the huge main room (that has me in it)? Would separating them like that only make things worse? Any herbal remedies to calm newly competitive kitties?

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  1. Sarah

    Hi there- there may be an underlying issue that is unknown or unrealized to you that is causing this change in behavior. So that might be worth investigating. As far as keeping them separated in your studio- have you tried to make places where they can “escape” to? For instance, we used to have a cat that was very sociable, but when she needed her alone time she would go up on the window sill of our basement window (high up) where no one else could bother her. When the cat we currently have needs a break from the dogs, she goes on the shelf in our closet where she can be alone. Maybe a cat tree or a high shelf might be helpful? 🐾💛

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Nemanja | 2 years ago
Hello Guys, I Have A Strange Question. I Have Two Degus, One Of Them (a Couple …

Hello guys, I have a strange question. I have two degus, one of them (a couple months older) is a male, the other one was not really identified as the people in pet shop were not sure, but we are pretty sure it’s a girl. They didn’t get along when we first put them together in one cage and would start fighting, but after some time of exchanging them from one cage to another, they became friends and now we keep them together recently. My question is: in last couple of days, the smaller one (a female?) is humping our older degu, which is a male 100%. Is this normal, or is this only possible if both of them are males? Even if it’s asserting dominance, the smaller one should not be a dominant one, right? I am really hoping you can help. Thank you very much, Nem

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Me | 2 years ago
Dr Krista – I Am A YouTube Watcher With A 22yo Cat That May Have Nasal …

Dr Krista – I am a YouTube watcher with a 22yo cat that may have nasal or ear polyps. We have spent 8 weeks trying every antibiotic, nasal steroid drop, antibac nasal drop and still fighting the snorking sound and her inability to breathe. Did nasal swab wk of 4/20 – found 2 bacteria, getting compounded anti bacs at this point since both bacs are super resistant apparently – Citrobacter freundii and pseudeomonas species. Antibacs will arrive to me in California by Thur 4/30 . She has a grade 3 heart murmur and hyper thyroid (on 5mg Methimazole daily). Just as your YouTube vid about Stripes with polyps (2/23/2018), I think I may be in the same situation – I have a vet telling me to go to a specialist for $$$ because everything we are throwing at this isn’t working. How in the world do I find someone like you who is willing to help me for a reasonable cost? I am calling all over for vets and everyone is ‘specialist focused’. Do you have tips on what to ask, experience, and honestly, I need someone with your confidence to do this. Or I need you 🙂 I have been in cat rescue over 30 yrs and ‘get; the lingo but have never had such difficulty finding a vet who could assist. Thank you in advance!

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello,
    I’m sorry to hear about your cat. I think that based on age alone it is less likely that it is a polyp and more likely that it is cancer. I say this based solely on experience. I think that I would call all the rescues and shelters around and ask for a trusted vet who would be willing to do a sedated exam to look for a polyp. After that it gets expensive to do the rhiniscopy and ct scan and honestly there is little to gain if it is cancer as it is not treatable. I would try the antibiotics, inquire about a steroid (difficult based on the thyroid and heart murmur but might be worth a trial) and even ask about intranasal cerenia drops. Also look for a feline medicine specialist and be honest about your budget.
    I hope this helps.

    1. Me Post author

      Thank you Dr Magnifico. I have now been/talked to 11 vets since this message to you 2 weeks ago, been to specialists, had nothing but the run around. This process has been agonizing, thousands of dollars, vets more interested in ensuring I know risk and that their liability is removed than caring for my kitty. I have labs, xrays, eco results, UA’s, spent thousands of $$ – and no one will do what you do – do a quick sedation and see if there are any polyps. Maybe she does have cancer but we DONT KNOW THAT FOR SURE. Is there anyway to pay you to review her records and advise me? I am up at nights, crying to figure this out and meanwhile losing valuable precious time and money where I could be helping my baby have a few more quality months/years. Thank you for considering.

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Jonathan | 3 years ago
Hey! Just Found Your Page From YouTube, Was Wondering If It’d Be Possible To Chat …

Hey! Just found your page from YouTube, was wondering if it’d be possible to chat about my cat? Almost certain he has a nasopharyngeal polyp but I am having trouble convincing any vets in the Dallas area to sedate him and take a look without him first getting scans and tests that cost thousands of dollars. Is there anything I should be asking them for differently? He’s been fighting a URI for about 5 months now and we have done six rounds of antibiotics with steroids and antihistamines to help and nothing has stopped his symptoms from returning and we have only now made the connection as to why that is. He has the distinct snore noise while breathing and every other listed symptom associated, I just can’t afford the tests the vets are saying they require, it’s very heart breaking. Any help or wisdom is appreciated, we just don’t have the money to do much else and he is degrading quickly since his last round of antibiotics ended this week. I wish I didn’t sound so sure, we just are panicking that we have wasted so much time and money and may have missed our chance to best this this while we could and now may be unable to. Just heart breaking all around.

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello,
    My advise in these cases is to call and keep calling until you find someone who you trust and can afford. It’s honestly why I see so many of these. Call the shelters. Call the local rescues and call the foundations that support pet care and ask for a person they know and recommend. They are out there but sadly they need to be searched for. If you find someone please let me know so I can pass it along. Like I said the local rescues know who is fair and affordable. Start there. Keep me posted. Very best of luck.

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Krista Magnifico | 3 years ago
Chronic Abscess In The Neck Of A Cat. What Are Your Options If It Doesn’t…
Treatment Cost (USD): $321.00
Bert is an indoor-outdoor cat. He came home one day with a swelling on his right shoulder about 1 week after his family noted he was limping. The initial exam (about 1 week before the drain was placed), revealed a slight fever, swollen and painful area of the right shoulder. The swelling was explored and a large amount of purulent material was found (puss). Bert was given an injectable antibiotic (Convenia) that lasts about 2 weeks. He was sent home to be monitored.
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Abbie Knights | 3 years ago
My 6 Month Kitten Came Down Stairs And Started To Play. However, It Was Wary…

My 6 month kitten came down stairs and started to play. However, it was wary of my other 11 month old cat. They started to chase each other but my littlest kitten, would hiss and growl. They would swipe at eachother, but then still chase and find eachother. After they chased eachother for a while, the oldest cat then jumped onto my kitten. The kitten started to hiss, and growl while they were kicking and swiping eachother. Is this normal? I broke up the “fight” with a spray bottle.

Both are neutered and male.

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    I’m not sure what your question is? If you are wondering how to get them to get along you need to provide a more gradual introduction. I suggest the new cat be a room by themselves for a week. Or more. Allow the other cats to sniff each other under the door. From here go to placing the new kitten in a cage with a hiding box inside it and allow them to see each other without being able to fight until they are all getting along. Then you can allow them to interact. Please understand that not all cats get along. Even after long periods of time together. Some cats need their own time and space and to be away from the cats they don’t like. Just like people.

  2. Abbie Knights Post author

    Sorry, my question is, is it normal for them to play like that. I heard it was roughhousing but i just want to have a second opinion.

    The 6 month kitten has its own room, amd we have been slowly introducing them. Bith the cats are boistrous. So maybe this could be a problem in the future.

  3. Stacey Harris

    Hi Abbie! wow bet u love having kittens in your home; I love cats obsessively, but kittens are really only that, kittens the first year and they’re like children; they grow up into teenagers and lose their “cuteness” overnight. Your cats are almost “teenagers” in cat terms and just like male teenagers, when they hit puberty they become aggressive; My question is how long since you nuetered them? It can take a few months for the aggressive hormone from testis removal, subsides. My female cats are 9 years old and almost daily “fight”. According to Jackson G., its fine to let cats battle; just let it go. Dont use a spray bottle or other means to break it up (i.e. soda can full of pennies,), If they have their claws intake, its best to step in by using your voice to startle until they look at u. I stand up and start to move toward them, and they break up and run. My cats are litter mates and hate each other vehemently, and Ive now been able to stop all aggressive behavior, with a Hey! Stop it!!!! and a quick snap of my fingers. You can do this.!! Good luck!!

  4. Krista Magnifico

    Thanks Stacey! I have two cats who hate each other too!!. And I often break up fights by clapping my hands to distract them and break it up. I adore Jackson galaxy. He’s wonderful and a terrific source for cat advice! Thank you for your kind words and encouragement. Xox krista

  5. Stacey Harris

    KM, while I was typing my response I saw your reply; amen, my cats are 9 yrs old, litter siblings and have always been boisterous; We as pet owners need to chill out, we obsess over our fur babies.

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Monique Luna | 3 years ago
Hello. A Week Ago I Had To Take My Do To The Emergency Due To…

Hello. A week ago I had to take my do to the emergency due to having a fight with my other dog. And she had to go through surgery. Lasted 2 hours waiting for her. After 6 days from her surgery I noticed a lump. She wasn’t in pain when I touched her, it felt like fluids inside so I called the animal hospital talked over the phone made an appointment that night they told me it was fluids but said to me if it doesn’t come down by Monday to bring her in. But I was reading about not to drain her cause it might be back in couple of hours all the fluids. Should I just leave it alone? What should I do !

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello,
    I would follow up with either your regular vet or the ER you used. Someone needs to look at it in person especially if it shows any sign of infection; painful, red, foul smelling, discharge, or your dog is not acting like their normal healthy self. Also make sure the rabies vaccine for the other dog is up to date.

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Courtney Conaway | 4 years ago
I Have A 2 Yr 8 Mo Old Cat Milo Who I Am Desperate To…

I have a 2 yr 8 mo old cat Milo who I am desperate to find relief for. He has been sick since I adopted him at 4 months. I was told right away by the shelter vet that he had feline herpes, and that he would always be sick, but that we could treat the symptoms. Over the next 2 years, we have found ourselves at every vet in the area, seeking out treatment options for Milo, and have also had emergency visits on 5 different occasions when Milo got to the point that he could barely breathe. Milo means more to me than anything in the world, and I have promised him that I will never stop searching and fighting for an answer to help him feel better.

Milo is getting worse as he gets older. At this point, his breathing is audible 24/7 (snoring/snorting noises with every breath) regardless of what antibiotic he’s on. He sneezes dramatically (sometimes 10 times in a row) to the point that there is snot on many of the walls/windows. He makes choking noises/coughing as if there is congestion stuck in his throat that he is trying to get out. There are times at night when I am woken by his breathing because it gets so loud. He occasionally is struggling so much with congestion that he will find a quiet place to sit and close his eyes while he mouth-breathes.

At some vet visits, he ironically ends up breathing/feeling a bit better when we get there and they’ll tell me “this is a healthy cat!” and I go home only for his symptoms to return.

However, at other visits over the years Milo has been diagnosed with allergies, asthma, conjunctivitis, viral URI infection, bacterial infections, etc. We’ve tried Benadryl, terramycin, doxycycline, L-Lysine, Famciclovir, prednisolone, azithromycin, little remedies nasal saline and nebulizing sterile saline. The next step is nebulization of Gentamycin (which I called every pharmacy in the area trying to find and ended up having to order from a specialty pharmacy.) It won’t be in until the middle of next week, and it breaks my heart to watch Milo struggle as we wait for yet another antibiotic that might not work.

Recently we found a vet who suggested they thought Milo has nasal polyps, but said that I would need to see a specialist to find out for sure. At this recommendation, I immediately made Milo an appointment 45 minutes away (and over a month wait). When we finally got in, the specialist told me that it was very unlikely that Milo had nasal polyps, as they are not common in younger cats. They offered to do some preliminary testing to rule out other illnesses first. They did bloodwork and xrays (which cost $900) and found that Milo was positive for Bordatella and Mycoplasma infections. The herpes test came back negative, but they told me that it often comes back with a false negative when the infection is chronic. They put him on an azithromycin paste which didn’t help whatsoever, and then suggested the gentamycin nebulization. They said that if Milo isn’t showing improvement after a week of the nebulized antibiotic, that we could consider a rhinoscopy and a CT scan to check for other underlying problems (such as polyps) which would run around $2600 total.

I should note that all of this is cost-prohibitive for me, but as I’m sure you can tell, I would spend every dime I had if it made Milo better. Any suggestions or recommendations that you have for us are GREATLY appreciated as I feel like we are nearing a dead end. We are 4 hours from your office but id be more than willing to come out there for your help.

Thank you in advance,
Courtney & Milo

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello,
    I’m sorry this has been such a difficult road for you. Here are a few suggestions;
    1. Has he been tested for felv/fiv?
    2. Has anyone looked for a polyp? In my experience they are more common in young shelter cats than older cats.
    3. Has anyone discussed rhinoscopy? That would be my first places to start.
    Some cats absolutely have chronic herpes with chronic sinusitis. They are chronically snotty cats. I have one who is 7 now. She has and always will be throwing snot on my walls. It is who she is. We live with it.
    As long as she is happy, eating, active (well as active as her lazy pampered life can be) she is left alone. I do give intermittent antibiotics every so often but not too much any more. She has outgrown the worst of it.
    Try to assess what you can. Treat what is treatable. And then (my advice) live with what you can’t treat or afford to diagnose. If Milo is happy and healthy (I am not sure about either of these that is for you to assess) then let him live his life and know he may always be snotty.. but definitely check for a polyp. It is quick and easy (and should be cheap in my opinion).

  2. Courtney Conaway Post author

    Hi Krista! Thank you so much for your response. Milo’s bloodwork did include a felv/fiv test which was thankfully negative. They have not yet checked for a polyp, but my specialist said it would be checked for in the $2600 CT/Rhinoscopy. I’ve seen your videos where you check for one, remove it and charge a few hundred dollars, so it’s really disappointing to me that they are giving such an estimate. Milo is happy in my opinion. He loves to play and “talk” to us through little meows. I’ve been told many times that he is just going to be this way, but it’s hard for me to live each day wondering if there’s more I could do (or a giant polyp in there causing all of this). Do you think the expensive rhinoscopy/CT scan/polyp check would be worth it? I’d hate to spend $2600 for them to tell me they didn’t find anything.

    Thanks again,

    Courtney & Milo

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Nicholas P. Woodward | 4 years ago
So, We Just Adopted A 3 Year Old Morkie, And Were Warned That Sometimes She’ll…

So, we just adopted a 3 year old Morkie, and were warned that sometimes she’ll steal an article of clothing, hide under a table with it, and possibly bite if you try to get it back from her. Well, I just doctored my girlfriend’s fingers after a little fight they had over a sock. Other than yelling at her (the dog) and saying “no” we’re now ignoring her. What’s the best way to handle this and train her to behave better?

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello!
    The fact that you just adopted her and don’t know much about her previous training, behavior and attitude makes advice for this a little difficult. In general I start with a very minimal access approach. She has to earn everything and you aren’t setting her up to be “bad or disappointing”. You are going to have a very difficult time teaching her much other than to be afraid/untrusting of you when you get in between her “stuff” or try to reprimand. In my opinion anything this early that is negative, I know even when you are being beaten, (sorry) teaches her to be untrusting and afraid of you. Too often people want to start at “well trained” when they really have a new pet who doesn’t know you, your expectations, or their new world. I suggest crate training all the time. She is kept there, where she can slowly acclimate to you and her new home, and she earns toys after some basic training is implemented. I strongly suggest a puppy class to start. Take her for lots of walks. Spend time together doing stuff together on neutral territory, like outside. As she starts to understand you you can start progressing toward other activities.
    I will add that she needs to feel safe and loved. So always put her in her crate with an affectionate word and give her a toy to keep her company (if she doesn’t guard that).
    Overall she has a lot of adjusting to do and you need to be patient and understanding that this is a process. A process dependent on patience, love and dedication. Never get angry. Never yell. You both need to adjust to each other.
    No toys, no decisions, no options except love and start really slow. Letting her have a safe space that is her own and building on this is where I would start.
    Let me know how things go. Sending ♥️ And best wishes.
    Krista.

  2. Nicholas P. Woodward Post author

    Thank you for the sound advice! We appreciate the sentiments on positive reinforcement and building trust. She spent the next hour following my girlfriend around and apologizing trying to lick her wounds away.

  3. Sarah

    Congrats on your new dog? I’m just adding to the good advice you’ve already gotten. I am a firm believer in walks… no matter what size of dog. It’s a fantastic way to share quality time and bond, while getting the exercise needed. A tired dog is usually a better behaved dog. Even a ten minute walk has the potential to change behavior for the rest of the day, for the better. And I agree strongly with everything shared above, especially getting involved in a basic obedience class. Even if your new girl already has basic obedience, she needs to learn you and what you expect. It is another great way to bond and earn trust. Another plus to the walks is practicing your homework from obedience class? best of luck and again, Congrats!!??

  4. Nicholas P. Woodward Post author

    Thank you, Sarah! I do see that she has a LOT of energy to play. The more we do that and walk her it seems the better she is for sure.