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Cheryl | 3 months ago
It’s A Long Story, But I Will Try To Make It Brief. Molly, 3.5 Month Old …

It’s a long story, but I will try to make it brief. Molly, 3.5 month old Labrador patient of Dr. Magnifico, unfortunately found a canister of Trident Gum that had fallen between the front seat and back seat of the vehicle. We were traveling across the state and stopped at a Vet Clinic. I knew Xylitol was poisonous to dogs. The receptionist consulted with the Dr. and he said to call the Animal Poison Control Center and meanwhile try to induce vomiting. We didn’t have to induce, but she started vomiting on her own. I did administer peroxide to make sure she emptied her stomach. This all took place within 1/2 hr window. We started on the road again as the nearest Emergency Hospital was an hour and 1/2 away. I called the Poison center and the Veterinarian on the line did the toxicology calculation and said Molly really needed emergency treatment. She told me to give Molly some kibble to ward off hypoglycemia. We got her to the emergency hospital and they started testing her blood sugar (elevated to 133), administered an antidote for Xylitol, checked her ALT liver value (114 reading) and gave her dextrose and a liver supplement. This all took place late Monday night into Tuesday. On Tuesday, Molly seemed to be recovering nicely and I was expecting her to come home on Wednesday. On Wed afternoon, they said her ALT Liver value was elevated 1 point (76 instead of 75 which is normal) and they were concerned. 1 pt doesn’t seem that alarming, but I’m not a toxicologist. They will do another test this evening and I am to call them Thursday morning. 🙁 I have already paid $1500 for what was supposed to be for up to 36 hrs care. In your opinion, does the 1pt ALT elevation warrant another evening in Emergency Hospital as opposed to her staying with Jarrettsville Vet for care?

2 Responses

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello,
    I’m so sorry this happened.
    I. My opinion no. The elevation is so minimal that I wouldnt have been too concerned.
    I’m sorry I didn’t get to this sooner. I hope you are all ok.

  2. Cheryl Post author

    Thank You Dr. Magnifico 🙂
    Molly is back to her normal puppy self now. My fault for not just calling you regarding her ALT level rather than reach out on this venue. Hope to see you soon so we can figure out the dosage needed for her preventatives. Have a Wonderful Weekend! Enjoy this beautiful weather if you can!!

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Crystal | 2 years ago
Hi Pawly Friends, My 3-year-old Cat Is Having UTI And His Have Blockage. He Has A …

Hi Pawly Friends, my 3-year-old cat is having UTI and has a blockage. He has a very hard time with urine and sometimes he urined blood. He has no appetite to eat, but when he gets too hungry he will eat his dry food that the vet provided. I brought him to the vet two weeks ago. They unblocked him using a catheter and hospitalized him for almost a week without IV fluids. I brought him back but he’s still weak and wouldn’t eat. After a day of staying at home, he peed in blood in such a big amount. I brought him to the vet again at around 1 am because I was too afraid. The vet uses the catheter again and hospitalized him for another week. Again, I brought him home with some antibiotics and some other meds, he was so hungry because he didn’t eat well in the hospital. I boiled fish for him (no added spices, preservatives, etc) to mix with the dry food because he wouldn’t eat it alone. He ate and drank a lot. After 3 days, he started to pee in the blood again! HELP I don’t know what else can I do to help my baby!

2 Responses

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello,
    I’m sorry to hear about your cat. Was bloodwork, Xray or urinalysis done? It might even be time for an ultrasound? It is time fir a diagnosis and better treatment plan. It is also time for medications and at home sq fluid therapy. I think I would also recommend seeking a second opinion. It just seems like you aren’t really getting anywhere with your current vet and treatments.

    1. Crystal Post author

      Thanks, will bring him to another clinic tomorrow. For the meantime, he’s getting weaker every day. He pees while sleeping or while walking now, more bloods on the floor, sometimes my bed. I’m afraid I will lose him. Anyways, bloodwork, Xray and urinalysis is done. He’s bladder is always full and is now blocked by mucus. We were given cystopro (protexin), and some inflammation meds.

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Elizabeth | 2 years ago
Good Evening! I Am A Client At Jarrettsville Veterinary Center And The Front Desk Ladies Very …

Good evening! I am a client at Jarrettsville Veterinary Center and the front desk ladies very helpfully advised me to post here saying I was a client to ask my question. =) We are in a bit of a kitten conundrum.

Our neighbors’ barn cat had kittens, and they are living under our garden shed. The kittens are about 7 weeks old or so, according to my neighbors, and they are extremely friendly, outgoing, adventurous, playful, etc. We are assisting the neighbors in trying to find them homes, and we are trying to figure out when it is appropriate to separate the kittens from their mother. We have read/heard 12-14 weeks, however we (my husband and I) are concerned for the kittens’ safety. There are foxes and hawks that live around our house, and the mother cat is staying away from the kittens for longer and longer. The kittens are starting to venture out further and further away from the safety of our shed (where they are just…exposed in our yard), and we are uncomfortable with the idea of leaving them outside for 6 more weeks (though they have managed this far okay).

Additionally, the mother cat has already moved the kittens twice, according to the neighbors, and they didn’t know she was over here until we found the kittens and told them. We are worried that she might move them again and we might not be able to find them if she does so. We are willing to bring them into our house for their safety, but the mother bolts, and we are worried about hurting the kittens’ development during this young stage of their lives and causing mama cat undue stress. We also don’t want them to get eaten by foxes or hawks. =\ Any advice would be super helpful!

Thank you!

1 Response

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello;
    Thank you for helping them. If they are eating on their own it is safe to take them inside and separate them from mom. But please have mom spayed and vaccinated. The kittens can be vaccinated at about 6 weeks and rehomed at 8 weeks. Mom should be safely caught in a live trap and transported to the vet in it. We don’t want anyone to be bitten as they are not vaccinated for rabies. We at Jvc are happy to help. We can also help with putting you in touch with rescue groups who can assist with this

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Roxana | 2 years ago
My Cat Has Been Constipated Since Wednesday, We Noticed Afterwards He Couldn’t Urinate And Had …

My cat has been constipated since Wednesday, we noticed afterwards he couldn’t urinate and had a few droplets of blood. He threw up wouldn’t eat or drink water. We took him to the emergency room yesterday. It was to expensive for a 48 hours stay, so we opted for 24 hour stay where they monitored him; he was on fluids and sedated him for the unblockage. He was catheterized on Saturday and was removed today (Sunday). He’s home but still straining a bit to poop and pee. I don’t know if this is normal. They didn’t prescribe me anything just change his diet (they gave me some food) and his urine samples to take to my vet for check up. Is there any recommendations to give to my cat? Or take him to the vet. It’s expensive for as it is now with paying for 1k for him and I can’t afford another unblockage. Is there anything that will dissolve the crystals (the emergency doc said he has that but still gave me urine sample to take to his clinic).

Thank you

UPDATE
I contacted Long Island Spay & Neuter they referred me to Grady Animal Hospital in Long Island. And he is staying there for 48 hours. Taking Jimmy back to the vet was the right choice. Praying everything will be ok.

5 Responses

Comments

  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello,
    Your cat needs to see a vet ASAP. Today. As close to right now as possible. Please call your regular vet and tell them what is going on. Someone needs to examine your cat, Determine if he is blocked again and help you get through the next few weeks. In my opinion these cases need multiple days of iv fluids and very close monitoring omg with a few medications to have the best chance of success. Good luck. Please add to this question with updates to let us know what happened.

    1. Roxana Post author

      I took him to his regular vet; they did an exam on him again and they said his bladder is once again full. They said the only option is now to unblock him or to euthanize him. I don’t have the money to unblock him and I don’t want to euthanize him. I don’t want him to suffer though. The vet didn’t give us the option of the Perineal Urethrostomy surgery which I’m looking at pricing, and I don’t know if I should get but I would rather invest on this so his blockage won’t happen again. But I’m running out of time, I don’t want him to suffer.

      He urinated a lot today in my bed, I don’t know if its good or bad. He is still blocked as we speak and it hurts me to just see him like this.

    2. Roxana Post author

      I’ve watched your youtube videos on this and it made me go to the emergency room the first time.

      Do you know of any low cost hospitals around New York, NJ or PA?

  2. Sarah

    Hey- hopefully you got into see your regular vet. Blockage is serious and time is not your friend. Diet change may help, but only after the original problem for the blockage is addressed. When our cat had a blockage, he was on an IV for quite sometime and had to stay two nights at our vet at the time. Then we were sent home with specific instructions and what to look for and when to call and pain meds. Hope your cat is going to be alright.

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Amber | 3 years ago
I Am The Owner Of A 2 Year Old English Bulldog. Last Year His Urethra Prolapsed And …

I am the owner of a 2 year old English Bulldog. Last year his urethra prolapsed and he received a purse string suture and was neutered at the pet ER in Bel Air. The issue resolved itself and he had been doing well until this last week when the urethra prolapsed again. We took him through the Towson pet ER so he could see a surgical specialist. They evaluated him and suggested surgery. After surgery they sent him home to recover and stressed the importance of him staying calm. We stayed by his side, even staying home from work, to ensure that he didn’t do anything to distrupt the healing. We kept him in a play pen and carried him up and down the stairs to potty. Two days after the surgery (and lots of bloody laundry later) we noticed that he was extremely uncomfortable even while on the pain and sedative meds. We also noticed the protrusion of his urethra tissue. We took him back to the surgeon and they confirmed that the urethra has prolapsed and they have recommended that the surgery be performed for a second time (tomorrow). We have ruled out the obvious contributing factors that may cause pressure such as stones, uti, etc. Any thoughts for treatment options moving forward? Are we missing anything? I just want our little guy to start feeling well again! Thank you.

Amber

3 Responses

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello.

    These are really frustrating cases. I’m so sorry about your experience and I empathize completely. I guess my first concern is that we don’t often know why this happens. My second concern is that you are going to repeat the same surgery and it should be assumed the failure has a pretty fair chance of happening again. My preference as the surgeon for cases like these (and they happen to all of us) is to both offer a redo (although I will admit I rarely charge or I charge a nominal redo fee) is to also offer a different surgeon to try over. My concern is that failing twice is an awful big expenditure and a tough explanation as to why I didn’t see that coming. My personal preference is to refer these difficult refractory cases to the vet teaching hospitals. They have faster easier and better access to more minds and more diverse experience. You just can’t get that at a private facility. I use UPenn or va tech vet schools. They are often cheaper and give a broader access to options and experience. I hope this helps. Please let me know what happens. I would love to hear a follow up and I would love to hear about your previous surgery and experience. Especially to add this to our storylines page. It is such a unique case. Very best of luck. Krista.

    1. Amber Post author

      Thank you so much for your reply and suggestions. We will move forward with the second attempt to repair the prolapse despite the low success rate and cost associated. If it is unsuccessful we will need to get another opinion. I hadn’t thought to consult with a vet school and I think that is great advice. I will certainly keep you posted along the way.

  2. Laura

    I want to second Dr. M’s recommendation of a vet school. UPenn is phenomenal – we drove up from Timonium. They couldn’t help my puppy but they literally threw everything they could at him to diagnose his issue, and it was more than the local vets could do.

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Marshmallow The Rabbit | 3 years ago
My Bunny’s Breathing And Nose Twitching Is Very Fast. My City Is In The Middle…

My bunny’s breathing and nose twitching is very fast. My city is in the middle of a heatwave and my bunny has recently just been laying on my kitchen tiles. My sister is staying over and she is very loud and has startled my bunny a lot. I tried to have her lay down on an ice pack but she kept trying to EAT the ice pack so I took it away. I put water in a spray and tried spraying her (it was a mist, not that much water came out) but my bunny would take one spray and run away. Her nose is twitching VERY fast and her breathing is crazy. I was wondering if there was a way I could calm her down. Is she doing OK as well? Her coat is not very thick and she is albino. Thank you.

2 Responses

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  1. Sarah

    Good morning. Is there anyway that you can call your vet right away?

  2. Krista Magnifico

    hello,
    I would be worried about overheating, but stress, pain, and disease are also possible. Its best and safest to head to the vets.

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Pawbly | 4 years ago
Sushi Is My 12-year Old Cat With An Inoperable Cancerous Tumor. Last Weekend She Stopped…

Sushi is my 12-year old cat with an inoperable cancerous tumor. Last weekend she stopped eating and was vomiting bile. At the vet’s, her bloodwork showed high kidney and creatinine levels. After three days on an IV, her kidney levels returned to normal, but the creatinine remained high, confirming her cancer diagnosis. While the vet said she had been eating well in the office, since she came home three days ago, she has not eaten at all. We’ve tried everything: k/d wet and hard food, chicken and rice, her regular food, baby food, tuna, and Fresh Pet, but she hasn’t eaten anything, although she is drinking water. Sushi is very lethargic and stays in her hiding place most of the time. We go back to the vet in the morning, but I hate to put her through another stay at the vet’s if the results may be the same. Can anyone give me advice as to what I should do? I cannot stand the fact that she may be suffering.

2 Responses

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  1. Sarah

    Good morning. I’m so sorry about your cat. I am sure you must be struggling with “what should I do? Can I do more? Can I do anything?” I think a truthful conversation with your vet this morning is important. We had to put one of our dogs down this past June because of cancer. He was a trooper and we made him comfortable as long as we could, but finally in June, he just told us it was time. He stopped eating, even when I tried to hand feed, he wouldn’t come off his bed unless he absolutely had to… I guess what I’m sharing is that our pets communicate with us. You know your pet best. Your vet knows the situation. I think a visit and a conversation about Sushi today will help you figure out the next step.

  2. Yetta Adams

    The vet gave us an anti-nausea/appetite stimulator and pain pills. I just pray that these medicines will make Sushi feel like eating agan. Thank you so much for your response.

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Shiria | 5 years ago
Does Reflux In Premature Kittens Exist? I’m Asking Because We Got 4 Tiny Premature Kittens Yesterday…

Does Reflux in premature kittens exist?
I’m asking because we got 4 tiny premature kittens yesterday with their mother. She didn’t have milk when the were born, so the little ones were bottle fed/syringe fed the 2 days before they came to us.. However since she still showed interets in her babys they stayed with her. They had around 70gram according to their owner. When they arrived, they were cold and crying. One died a few minutes after they arrived, despite slowly warming up. It had tiny bits of milk in its nose.
(they were fed ca. 60 minutes earlier)

When they were finally warmed up two were drinking, one was fed with a syringe. All were urinating normally, one had a bit of bowel movements (yellow and soft). I placed them to their mother who was very worried about her babies and cuddled around them immediatly. She had a heat pad below her box to help keeping the temperature. She was extremly nervous, so I left her alone for the time being.
When I looked after them for the next feeding, the second one was dead. Milk around nose and mouth. I checked for cleft palate, but there was none visible.
The other two also showed no signs of a cleft palate. However, they felt cold again despite lying on their mothers belly.

I warmed them up again and this time I didn’t put them back – as it seemed that the despite mother and heat pad below they could’t keep their temperature. So they stayed in the box we use for raising kittens.

One was drinking, one was not. The none drinking was tube fed. When I looked after them a ca. 15 minutes later the non drinking one hat milk running out of its nose and mouth. I cleaned it immediatly and it started breathing again – but I guess it still got something in its lungs, as it died a few minutes later.

The remaining one was now warm, still urinating normally and drinking. But it couldn’t settle down. It was always crying and seemed restless. The next two feedings went normally – as dfar as that is possible with such a tiny one. When I wanted to feed it in the late evening I found it dead – a bit of milk running out of nose and mouth. It was the smalles one of them with only 67 gram.

I’m very worried that I did something wrong… They were not the first babys I bottle fed (or syring fed/tube fed). But it’s not like I’m very experienced… Usually the ones I get are at least full term… I only had one premature Baby before, that also died after 2 days. It had only 53 gram when being born – but it was with me since birth.
None of the babyies I cared lost as much milk through their nose – and especially not their mouth. The only ones that did this, had a cleft palate. The healthy babys may choke at some milk at the beginnig when they try to figure out the bottle – and may show a bit milk at their nose when doing so – but they never showed those problems. They were fine later,

These ones died more or less immediatly after I took them in – and that’s why I’m asking myself, if I did something wrong – or if I should do something different next time – as all of them showed milk at nose and mouth. The third one looked like it had spit our everything it drank earlier and the last one also had more than just a drop outside of nose and mouth. I only fed tiny amounts – ca. 1ml each feeding, to get them started, was that still too much? The previous owner said nothing about problems with feeding – and I used the same milk as them.

It seemed all aspirated milk because it came back out of their stomach (reflux).
I know reflux is not unusual in human preemies – but what’s with cats and is their a way to avoid that? (If that’s the reason for their problems at all). But if not why came the milk back up?

1 Response

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  1. Sarah

    Good morning. I’m so sorry that you had this experience. While I cannot truly answer your question about reflux, I just wanted to say that the fact that you cared so much and tried so hard does not go unnoticed. Thank you so much for trying?

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Delaney Donelson | 5 years ago
How Will I Know When My Adult Cats Are Ready To Be Unsupervised? I Recently…

How will i know when my adult cats are ready to be unsupervised? I recently adopted an 8 year old male who was previously bonded with another female (they adopted her and i couldnt let him stay in the shelter alone), and i already had a 6 year old female. Louie seems pretty easy going about the whole thing but Mia still seems skiddish. They only hiss every once and awhile and its usually started by her, im doing all i can to keep him in his own quarters but its very obvious he wants the freedom. It has been 5 days since i adopted him and i am allowing him to roam under supervision. How will i know when its okay to let him out permanently?
I just had to share pictures of my cute babies, 1st is Fat Louie(weighing in at a hefty 22lbs) and 2nd is my beautiful Mia.

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  1. Cheyenne M

    I’ve had this happen with lots of cats before, we always took in strays. Cats are a bit different then dogs so honestly the two will work it out. They’ll either learn to get along or just avoid each other on their own. You could leave them unsupervised anytime and it’ll be fine.

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Sarah | 5 years ago
Hi Pawbly Friends… It Was A Snowy, No School Day Here. Try As I Might, I…

Hi pawbly friends…
It was a snowy, no school day here. Try as I might, I could not get the dogs to stay in while the kids were out playing in the snow, and all that running and horse play took a toll on our 12 year old GSD Butch. He just fell going down the stairs…. not the whole stair case, the stepto get onto the landing. My husband picked him up and rather than having him try to use the stairs tonight, we brought him round the outside way to use the hill instead. He seems fine on his walk just now, but slow going. My question is this: he’s got rimadyl that we give him sparingly for pain from his arthritis. Should I give him some tonight, or wait til morning when he will probably be really stiff, or give tonight and tomorrow? Thanks for anyand all advice!

4 Responses

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  1. Sarah Post author

    Just to update:
    Butch is stiff this morning, so I did give him his pill. I did not give it to him last night because when I went fir the dogs last tuck in, he was already comfortable. He had a tough time getting up the stairs this morning, and we had to help him… he needs a little help most mornings, but again after all his playing and running yesterday its no surprise he needed more help than usual this morning. If any of you have any other advice on how to help him recover from thinking he was 10 years younger yesterday, please share.

  2. Anonymous

    I didn’t see this last night but I wouldn’t give NSAIDs preemptively.

    I think I would try to work on leashing him if he’s going to go a little off his rocker on snow days. 😉 That or work on the kids not letting him out.

  3. Anonymous

    Oh, and for recovery, crate rest for the day.

  4. Julie Brader

    Hi Sarah, just wondered if you had considered Acupuncture for Butch? I know it helps a lot of dogs.
    You could also ask your Vet about Gabapentin as an alternative to Rimadyl. It gives good pain relief and has no side effects in canines.
    Do hope Butch is feeling better soon ?