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Andrew | 2 years ago
Hi. My Welsh Springer Was Drinking Alot But Not Eating For 4 Days And Following An Ultrasound …

Hi. My Welsh Springer was drinking alot but not eating for 4 days and following an ultrasound was diagnosed with pyometra. She underwent surgery ten days ago.
Since having the operation she still refuses to eat. She has had anti nausea treatment as well as mirtazapine. The vet has now also prescribed trazodone. We did book her in to stay at the vets for a couple of days and they said she did eat some chicken. They showed me a video as evidence. Physically they could find nothing wrong with her. On returning home she still refuses to eat but is drinking. She will not eat anything, even her favourite treats, her usual dog food, nothing. So far it has cost me nearly ยฃ2000 for her treatment and I have no funds left. It really feels as though she will starve herself to death, although I thought dogs would never do this. I have tried restoring her old pattern of eating and have removed uneaten food after an hour and offered her nothing until her next meal but she still will not eat. I am at a loss as what to do next. Thanks for your advice. Andrew.

4 Responses

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello,
    Iโ€™m sorry to hear that your pup isnโ€™t bouncing back as you had hoped. I would call the vet back and ask for help. I would also talk about placing a feeding tube to supplement food and give her some more time to return to normal. At this point it is too long to safely wait. She needs the nutrition and she needs help in getting it. A small nasal-gastric tube can be placed with minimal topical sedation and it will at least help with liquid meal delivery. I would also look at any medications you are giving and consider stopping them all. Also I would ask about adding cerenia. It has helped me with cases like this many times. I hope this helps. Keep offering any and every kind of food. Meat flavored baby food, canned cat food, macaroni and cheese, purreed food of any kind. Keep offering. Best of luck.

    1. Andrew Post author

      Thank you. I will keep trying and speak to the vet about the tube.

  2. Sarah

    Hello-
    I am sorry this is happening. I would definitely speak to the vet again and ask about help in feeding her. I would also try to entice her with boiled chicken or hot dog pieces or ham…. anything that is a super treat that might get her into eating again. I hope she is ok!!๐Ÿพ๐Ÿ’›

    1. Andrew Post author

      Thank you. I have tried her with chicken, ham etc. No joy.

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Courtney Ruggles | 6 years ago
Two Days After Christmas My Dog Was Diagnosed With IVDD And Has Two Herniated Discs…

Two days after Christmas my dog was diagnosed with IVDD and has two herniated discs pushing on his spinal cord. We are going the strict cage-rest and steroids route hoping for some recovery. We are only 4 days into treatment and I am feeling hopeless. I’ve read that usually they get worse before they get better, but Fratley (Welsh Corgi) seems to be very slowly getting worse. The good news is he seems to mostly be in control of bowel movements and urination (only one pee accident so far), and when he has a bowel movement, his tail stub makes the usual contracting motions indicating voluntary muscle control. However, he went from wobbly legs, to no longer able to move his legs voluntarily. I am having trouble determining if he still has deep pain sensation is his legs. It seems like he reacts, but he can’t move his legs to pull them away. I know the recovery takes several weeks.. am I panicking too early? Does it really get a little worse before it gets better? :(. I love him with all of my heart and it has me in tears every night. If anyone is more intimately familiar with disc problems in dogs, please help me to understand when I should see progress…

2 Responses

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello!
    As we speak I am uploading videos of Hank a dog I took care of for two weeks because his family couldn’t manage him. It took 10 days before he showed any signs of improvement and by day 15 he was up and almost running. Please find my YouTube channel Krista Magnifico IVDD and look at Hanks videos. I tell my clients to not loose hope for at least two weeks. And believe me I know how hard it is during the first few days. See if the videos answer your questions. And reach out to me if you need encouragement or support.
    Best wishes
    Krista

  2. Courtney Ruggles Post author

    Krista, thank you so much for the immediate response!! Your words of encouragement mean so much. I’m going to look up the video right now!

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man col | 7 years ago
Ok, I Did Some Research. I Am Debated Of Either Getting A Basset Hound (dogs…

Ok, I did some research. I am debated of either getting a Basset Hound (dogs better suited to be home alone, sleep a lot), or maybe a Pembroke or Cardigan welsh corgi. If I Left a basset or a corgi home in a medium sized room, with lots of toys etc. and gave it a good 2-30 minutes walk in the morning and when i got back. (they would be home alone from 8-545 Mondays, and wednesdays. Tuesdays, thursdays, and fridays someone would be home. Tuesdays and fridays, my cleaning lady is home and although she won’t walk them, they would be fine with her there, she would maybe feed them too. Thursdays my mom is home. My point is, if I were to leave the dog home, would hebe fine under the circumstances listed above, and also not inside of a cage? Again, they would be fenced to about a medium sized room. I would give a walk in the morning, as well as when I get home from school, as well as maybe later in the night near bedtime. Also, Would It be suggested if I did get a dog (and didn’t want to adopt) to get a maybe 8-9-10 month old dog for these circumstances? Thanks

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  1. Anonymous

    like i said in your other question…

    that COULD work, but i’d still encourage the use of a crate. dogs enjoy small den-like spaces, and a crate gives them a safe space to be. since you *can’t* keep an eye on the dog 24/7, this is a safe alternative for them, at least until the dog knows the rules of the house and has demonstrated an ability to be trusted in the house.

    an older puppy would be a better idea than an 8-week old, definitely. ๐Ÿ™‚ get on some waiting lists and talk with the people running the rescues. i will say this: corgis are working dogs (herding, specifically) and will need a LOT of mental work to thrive. bassets are less active in general, and don’t seem to get bored as easily as corgis. both come with health problems i encourage you to research thoroughly before making your final decision. i’d also talk to the local chapters of both breed clubs, as they can be a wonderful resource if you’ve never really had a dog before. i know the local Doberman Pinscher club has been a huge help while we muddled our way through my first dog and my husband’s first Dobe. i got trainer referrals, vet referrals, and friends who can hand over a bottle of wine if my girl tests me too much. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    national club websites are:
    http://www.basset-bhca.org/
    http://www.cardigancorgis.com/
    http://pwcca.org/

    good luck!

  2. man col Post author

    So lets say I were to get an older puppy of either of these dogs. (Ive researched all the health and things like that). I couldn’t keep it in a crate all day while no one is home, 8-9 hours, that would be like torture?!

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man col | 7 years ago
Ok, I Did Some Research. I Am Debated Of Either Getting A Basset Hound (dogs…

Ok, I did some research. I am debated of either getting a Basset Hound (dogs better suited to be home alone, sleep a lot), or maybe a Pembroke or Cardigan welsh corgi. If I Left a basset or a corgi home in a medium sized room, with lots of toys etc. and gave it a good 2-30 minutes walk in the morning and when i got back. (they would be home alone from 8-545 Mondays, and wednesdays. Tuesdays, thursdays, and fridays someone would be home. Tuesdays and fridays, my cleaning lady is home and although she won’t walk them, they would be fine with her there, she would maybe feed them too. Thursdays my mom is home. My point is, if I were to leave the dog home, would hebe fine under the circumstances listed above, and also not inside of a cage? Again, they would be fenced to about a medium sized room. I would give a walk in the morning, as well as when I get home from school, as well as maybe later in the night near bedtime. Also, Would It be suggested if I did get a dog (and didn’t want to adopt) to get a maybe 8-9-10 month old dog for these circumstances? Thanks

2 Responses

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  1. man col Post author

    OK sure, I live in the New York City area so anywhere around there is fine

  2. PK Dennis

    How much experience do you have as a dog owner – it is always a bit easier to handle an older puppy as you outlined – then a very young one that needs to be fed 3-4 times a day and needs to pee often.  Even a dog 1 year or 2 years old will have lots of energy as any pup.  The breeds you are looking at are both good choices if you don’t want to run with a dog.  

    I would recommend a longer walk in the mornings – dogs need about an hour walk once a day.  Save the shorter walk for in the evenings, or play fetch with him/her then.  I have a carpeted hall that allowed my terriers to race up and down after balls in the evening (we walk 40 mins to an hour in the mornings).
    An older dog is going to settle into staying in a room faster than a young pup, but they will still need a crate to help you house train and keep them safe as they learn not to chew on power cords, etc.  Once you know that they are safe from those sort of activities then saying in a large room will work.  
    Double check with your cleaning lady – she may be fearful of dogs, or not want to deal with one.  Nothing worse then having a dog accidentally let loose buy a worker coming into the home while you are gone!  It would be safer for the dog to be crated on the days the cleaner comes.
    Keep in mind that this is a 15 year or more commitment to a living being – are you ready to take that step?
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Misa Smith | 7 years ago
Hi, This May Not Be The Right Place To Post This But Who Better To…

Hi, this may not be the right place to post this but who better to ask than pet owners! I am looking to buy a dog next year, I’ll be 22, recently graduated from college. I plan to travel right after I graduate, but I have to sit down for a few months and begin studying for the GRE and preparation to go to graduate school the following years. I’m going to have plenty of time to raise a puppy and take the extra special care baby dogs need! I have been contemplating a breed for 3-4 years now, because I don’t want to get something incompatible.

I am really active, rain or shine I like to go for hikes(2 miles minimum) but am looking for a doggy-companion for multi-day trips. I don’t mind lots of energy, I plan on doing training classes for bonding and lots of trips to the local dog parks for social and exercise time. I had been in love with the idea of getting a Pembroke Welsh Corgi, but now I am considering a Siberian Husky. Does anyone have any advice on breeds or what I should consider? I’m obviously open to other breeds too. Any advice is welcome!

Thanks.

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  1. julie brader

    Hi….the first thing that stood out from your post is that you want to travel. What would happen to your dog when you do? 

    Siberian Huskys are a breed that ideally need to do what they are bred for…..they are a working breed. Very active indeed. If you feel you could give one the attention and exercise it needs then go ahead. Other ‘high maintenance’ breeds include the Hunt Point Retrieve …..Weimaraners, German Shorthair Pointer, Hungarian Vizsla.

    If you want something a little calmer then Golden Retrievers and Labradors are always a good choice. 

    Whatever breed you go for please do your research before you go ahead and make sure you go to a reputable breeder for a puppy. Start with Breed Clubs and ask if there are any litters available. You may well have to wait a while for a puppy though.

    Good luck!

  2. PK Dennis

    So, once you have done your traveling then you may be ready for a puppy.  It may take up to one year to find a responsible breeder, get on their list, and then make it to the top of the list for a puppy.  Expect to pay $1000 to $3000 for a puppy from a responsible breeder.  If this price shocks you then you may want to consider adopting a puppy from a shelter.  That may shorten your wait, if you are willing to take any puppy, or it can lengthen your wait (if you still insist on a particular breed since purebred puppies don’t often appear in rescue).

    Never buy a puppy from a pet store, from online, or from an ad in the papers – the mothers and fathers of those puppies are living in hell, and every puppy purchased just encourages the production of more puppies – and the cycle of hell continues.  Just don’t do it!

    I can’t recommend any of the sled breeds for the life you outline above – these breeds need to run and pull.  Most people can’t provide the challenges these dogs need to live happy lives and the dogs become destructive or spend their days escaping & roaming.  If you RUN (not hiking, RUNNING) than a Husky might make sense — but really, happy Huskies are ones that get to pull a sled or an ATV for tens of miles every few days.

    I imagine you will be living in an apartment while you continue your education.  A Corgi is a better option for apartment living, and will be very happy with your hikes.  Corgi’s were bred to herd cows to market – this means they like walking with their people on long walks with short bursts of higher energy activity.  Probably a better fit for the lifestyle you describe.  Also the Corgi personality is pretty easy going for the most part.

    If you are a dominate/controlling person you might want to consider some of the terriers – especially the short legged ones (Cairns, Westies, Scotties, Border, etc).  They have the energy to hike with you, are very portable, and can settle nicely into apartment living.  They are big dog attitudes in a little package.  All of the Scottish breeds were bred to run the hills with a gamekeeper (i.e. hiking with a person!) on the hunt for vermin (fox, otter, badgers, etc.).  A long hike every day will keep all these short legged terriers happy!

    The long-legged terriers were often bred for dog fighting (Irish Terriers, Kerry Blue Terriers, etc) so they often become aggressive toward dogs they do not know – so I recommend you stick with the short legged terriers as a new dog owner.  

    If you are an easy going, kind of retiring personality then I suggest you stay away from terriers altogether!  All terriers will end up ruling the house if you aren’t willing to stand up to their willful ways every single day of their lives.

    There are several websites that help you pick a breed — they ask some questions and based on your response they give you a list of 3 to 5 breeds you should research.  I have used these websites for friends when they asked for my recommendations and so far we have had 100% happy results with the breeds I helped them pick based on the website recommendations.  AKC find-a-match is the one I use most often.

    Once you are ready for a dog, know which breed you think you want, then it is time to find a local breed club and start attending meetings.  Network with the people there, meet their dogs, get involved.  They will lead you to the responsible breeders.  Also find that breed’s rescue organization, put in an application with them and consider adopting an older dog – a lot of dogs lose their homes when they aren’t cute little puppies, but are still young enough to bring you a lot of puppy joy (such as a 1 year old dog).

    Good luck!