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Jennifer Taylor | 1 month ago
Today After Running Errands I Came Home To Find My 7yo Shepherd Mix Cowering In The …

Today after running errands I came home to find my 7yo Shepherd Mix cowering in the corner. Typically he runs to greet us. I made sure he hadn’t gotten into anything then I let him out while unloading groceries, typically he enjoys running around the farm but today he hopped into the back of my SUV and refused to budge. As my truck was in a shady spot I let him be with the hatch and windows open while I mowed. Now several hours later he is still in the back of my truck. He has been offered water which he drank and we let his Golden Retriever best bud out who he was happy to see but still refused to budge. Typically he is a “Velcro” dog and stays right with us, especially my daughter. This behavior is very out of character and has me concerned .

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scgreco413
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I am sorry you didn’t get a response sooner. I would be concerned as well with such a sudden change in behavior. I would get to the vet- just for peace of mind for sure. Even if you go and they find no temperature or anything else wrong, you will at least know that part of the equation is ok. Maybe he just ate something he shouldn’t have and will bounce back? I’m hoping by now you have a better idea of what is going on.

scgreco413
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Hi
Did you talk to the vet? I’m worried for your pup.

Krista Magnifico
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Hello,
It sounds like something got him startled and he needed a little change if scenery to get himself off the issue. If he’s still afraid of the kitchen start desensitizing him back to it.

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Jennifer Taylor | 10 months ago
I Rescued A Young Golden Retriever In May. She Had Spent The Start Of…

I rescued a young Golden Retriever in May. She had spent the start of her life abandoned in a small cage, she was emaciated, covered in fleas and ticks and of course living in her own waste. She is a wonderful dog, everything is new and she has very much been a blank slate. She is well exercised, is very social with our other dogs and has successfully completed a basic obedience class and will be moving on to 2nd level training and beyond. Thankfully she does not hold her rough start in life against humans in the least. Her only downfall is that she eats stool from our other dogs in the yard. We keep the yard clean, however we have 5 dogs. Even cleaning the yard daily is likely to leave a pile. She will even wait for our smaller dog to go to eliminate so she can eat it as fresh as possible. I imagine that she probably ate her own feces when she was starving, I am quite sure that this is a learned behavior. Over the course of 5 years my family has fostered 80+ dogs. I know that this is a very hard habit to break, however “poop kisses” are rather disgusting so I would love some input on what has worked for others! Thank you in advance.

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Krista Magnifico
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Hello My Dear Friend, My rescued beaglette does the same. She also has the same back story and yucky penchant for poop. Here’s what I do.. clean up waste asap (yes, honestly I am not the best at this as I recommend others to be). I also use a clicker or beeper to break her of it while she is doing it. Some non-vocal (she doesnt really want to listen to me anyway in the fever of the fervor to eat anything) cue to say “HEY! YES! I mean you need to stop that!” It takes a while but all… Read more »

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Jennifer Taylor | 2 years ago
Last Christmas Our Kitty Snacked On Our Live Christmas Tree. We Found The Needles…

Last Christmas our kitty snacked on our live Christmas tree. We found the needles in her stool. This also coincided with her being diagnosed with lymphoma. She is amazingly still with us, although life seems to be a series of ups and downs. As she has has digestive issues from lymphoma I certainly don’t want to cause any further irritation this holiday season. We are debating putting up an artificial vs real tree, however I wonder if ingesting the artificial matter (ie plastic) could be more iritating than organic matter. Thoughts?
If we had a room to simply close the tree in to we would, however we have an open floor plan….and if we didn’t have children we would skip the tree altogether!

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Krista Magnifico
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Hello,
I think I would do the real tree and try to minimize the chances of ingestion by offering safer substitutes like cat grass, cat nip and toys. You could also try to spray something to discourage her on the bottom branches like cedar, lemon/citrus, etc. safe but non-feline friendly. Sending best wishes for a safe uneventful holiday..

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Jennifer Taylor | 3 years ago
I Had Run Out My House Leaving Butter On My Counter To Thaw. I…

I had run out my house leaving butter on my counter to thaw. I arrived home to find 2 large piles of what I assumed was bile. While cleaning it up I realized it was in fact butter, to my horror my dog had consumed 3 sticks of butter. I have a call in to my vet but would love to know how bad this is to ease my mind. My boy is a Border Collie/GSD mix, 80lbs, 4 years and in good overall health, aside from vomiting he seems to be his normal self. (And yes, I know better than to leave anything on the counter.) Thank you!

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Jana Rade
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Well, it may or may not be bad; depending on how strong his system is. Butter is not toxic but it is, clearly, very high in fat. So the biggest danger from consumption of so much of it would be pancreatitis. I imagine some dogs might eat all that and just get a mild stomach upset. Others might get in a lot of trouble. Pancreatitis is painful and can be dangerous. If he’s still vomiting and/or looking ill, do see a vet asap.

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Jennifer Taylor | 5 years ago
This Puppy Is The Last Of A Large Litter, He Was One Of The Only…

This puppy is the last of a large litter, he was one of the only ones who would keep a clean crate/puppy pen. When the ground froze he discovered the practice of eating poo when he was outside in our fenced in yard. He was neutered a week and a half ago and we thought it would be an opportune time to remedy the poo eating issue since we had to leash walk him. He now refuses to poo outside, we do take him out every 1-2 hours and give a high value treat for pottying outside. He will go in his crate immediately after coming in and will immediately eat it. It almost seems that since I won’t allow him to eat what is in the yard he is just going to make his own snack. I will add that he is a very quick learner, he learned sit and down in an evening. He is very driven by treats and praise. He will urinate outside and looks to me for a treat and praise as he is going. He does not like to be in a messy crate, we know almost the moment it is soiled as he barks/whines and we clean it up. He will only poo in his crate, I do tether housetraining pups to me to eliminate the possibility of accidents (I try to set them up for success) and he has not accidents in the house. He will poo in his crate once I have exited the room where his crate is. I of course can smell the moment he goes, I run in the room and catch him eating it. I have gone as far as letting him out to potty in a pen thinking maybe he does not want to potty with an audience, I watch from a nearby slider but have only “caught” him pooing outside twice in a week and a half, both times I was able to deliver praise and a high value treat as soon as he was done. Lastly his crate is appropriately sized for him, it is a wire folding style crate that is just tall enough for him, he has enough room to lay, stretch out and turn around. This is something I would like to rectify as I know it will be a potential problem in a forever home.

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Your puppy is just being a ……puppy!  Sometimes the art of pet parenting is like the TV show Survivor–Outwit, Outsmart, Outlast.   Be diligent in cleaning up after your puppy poo’s. Do not give him the chance to play with or eat poo. Try placing the puppy on a leash when you take him outside to relieve himself, and do not allow him to inspect his poo. Distract him from by calling him to you, and when he responds appropriately, reward him with a treat and verbal encouragement (go crazy and act like he is the BEST PUPPY ON THE… Read more »

PK Dennis
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Walking helps the bowels move.  How about taking him on a walk when he comes out of his crate, and after he eats his meals.  The walking will get him eliminating and you will have him on a leash to control his movements while you pick up the poop.  This may work faster/better than turning him out in the yard and waiting, or wandering around the yard while he decides if he is going to poop or not. It may also be so exciting to be out and about that he forgets he wants to poop inside where he can… Read more »

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There are products out there to make the poo taste bad and most of them (I believe) have the main ingredient of MSG, which is the same thing as meat tenderizer. Dr. Foster and Smith has a product called Dis-Taste, but I’m sure there are others. If a dose of MSG isn’t harmful, give it a shot!

Brian Downie
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Hello Jennifer. My Great Dane did this and then my Golden Retriever starting doing it. Learned behavior? I agree with Dr. Mag’s suggestions. I taught the leave it command and do not leave them unattended when it is ‘potty time.’ I tried to read a lot of remedies for this issue. What I found was mixed reviews on the food additives to deter the poop eating. I read about nutritional deficits and remedies. What I read and think was going on with mine was most dogs like to keep their play and living areas clean. Sometimes when a mother has… Read more »

Brian Downie
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” The issue of eliminating in his crate began AFTER I restricted him from eating poo outside.” Maybe he learned it is not ok to poop outside?

Jennifer Taylor

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