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Jessica | 5 months ago
My 10 Week Old Kitten Has A Very Bad Humerus Fracture On Her Right Front Leg. I …

My 10 week old kitten has a very bad humerus fracture on her right front leg. I just came home from the animal hospital and they are telling us to take her to a specialist/surgeon tomorrow and that the surgery will be about $6k. I am beside myself because we just cannot afford this, but I know I need to do something. I have seen a video of a similar aged kitten with the same fracture and they were able to splint her and wrap it around her back to the other side to stabilize her shoulder and humerus. I am hoping I can find a vet willing to do this tomorrow but does this sound like it would heal? I was told amputation or euthanasia are the other options but we just got this kitten on Tuesday and would be heartbroken. We aren’t even sure how this happened, it’s been an overwhelming day! Any advice is appreciated.

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Krista Magnifico
5 months ago

Hello, Without knowing the specifics of this fracture I will say (and I believe this to be true) that all kittens heal. In vet med we have a saying “if you put a broken kitten in a cage and wait long enough they always put themselves back together”. (Well the saying is pretty close to that).. find a vet who will help you. Put this kitten in a cage just big enough for a small low sided blanket, food, water and a low sided litter box (or litter on newspaper) and let her rest. No playing. No leaving the cage… Read more »

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Maggie | 6 months ago
2 Year Old Neutered Male, Indoor Only. Was Taken To The Vets And Had Crystals Removed Form …

2 year old neutered male, indoor only. Was taken to the vets and had crystals removed form his bladder. His kidneys appeared to be a little elevated and was put on amoxycilin, prazosin and meloxidyl. Prazosin for 7 days, amoxycillin for 7 days and meloxidyl for 14 days.

He was absolutely fantastic for about 7 – 10 days. When he was ill previously he was very distant (usually extremely affectionate), hiding under sofa, lethargic, not eating or drinking, struggling to pee and mewing. This time when he was ill he has actually still been affectionate and following the owner everywhere, a little slow and seems sad, but mainly noticed that he kept trying to pee – even outside his litter tray. Took him back to the vets and they recommend euthanasia so went to another vet. They gave him an epidural to relieve his bladder and put him on Hypovase for anti spasm relief, gabapentin for pain and buprenorphine also alprazolam for anti spasm.
All the above happened in the last few weeks
He’s back in the vets again this morning with another blockage and because he keeps removing the cathather they want to remove the urine via needle!!
Any help would be appreciated.

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Sarah
5 months ago

Hi there- The experience that I had with my blocked cat (years ago) was time consuming. He did undergo surgery to remove the blockage. Then sent home after urinating on his own. We had to keep him confined as he needed to rest and recuperate, plus he was leaking for a while and clean up was easier in less space. He needed Rx food for the remainder of his days. His recovery took a few weeks, but he did live quite a long time after that experience. Our vet had also advised us to change the type of litter we… Read more »

Krista Magnifico
5 months ago

Hello,
Most of the cases is see happen like this. It takes weeks, months for the urethra to heal and the bladder to regain full function. I strongly suggest a canned urinary prescription diet and medication options to include a steroid. I also recommend discussing a PU surgery before recommending euthanasia.

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Sofia | 8 months ago
My Foster Cat, Who I Am Now Considering Adopting, Has Been Struggling To Breathe Properly For …

My foster cat, who I am now considering adopting, has been struggling to breathe properly for about 3 months now. He came into the shelter with a suspected URI. However, after months of treatment with antibiotics and a whole swath of other anti viral medications, the vet determined that he wasn’t getting any better and euthanasia is on the table. I want to get a second opinion before we make any drastic decisions. I am doing online research and suspect that perhaps he has a polyp, a tumor, or foreign object in his throat/nose.

While I am dying to explore these other solutions, the shelter told me if I adopt him and take him to a specialist costs could go up to $5,000. I don’t have that kind of money. I am in Olympia, Washington State. Does anyone recommend any veterinary hospital that is more affordable and can explore other resolutions at a more reasonable price? I don’t want to give up on him, but can’t afford to spend that kind of money.

Thank you so much.

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Krista Magnifico
8 months ago

Hello,
I always advise that you ask your vet for affordable options. If they can’t provide that ask the local rescues, shelters and pet centered foundations. Post online on all social media sites. There are affordable and accessible vets around but often it takes a lot of asking. If you do find someone please post your story on our storlylines section. It will help someone like you down the road. Good luck.

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Sandra | 9 months ago
Four Years Ago This Week, My Dog Connor Was Released From A Baltimore-area Veterinary Orthopedic And …

Four years ago this week, my dog Connor was released from a Baltimore-area veterinary orthopedic and sports medicine hospital after THREE failed TLPO surgeries and multiple significant infections, which created the beginning of Connor’s end. The reminders of this are coming up daily in my Facebook “Memories” feed, which is why I’m currently wrestling with taking action four years after the fact. Connor completely tore his CCL and the ortho surgeon sold me–HARD–on TPLO for him. This same practice and surgeon had successfully repaired a torn CCL for another of my dogs, Tessa, when she was five and a half years old. Connor was 13, and the surgeon was all but guaranteeing success, citing examples of 12-year-old Great Dane patients who regained great quality of life and movement. Connor fell off a ramp getting out of our car and three of the six screws broke after the first TPLO surgery. The surgeon did a second TPLO surgery, after which Connor went NOWHERE and did NOTHING, and the screws failed again. Plus, the second time, he developed an infection so bad I mistook the stench for a sewer problem I was having in my house. When the vet intern cut off his splint and dressing, what was inside was bright green and smelled horrendous. I’d been mistaking Connor’s crying and balking as stubborness, not recognizing he was in PAIN. The staff whisked Connor away to the back and kept him for more than a week. MONTHS later, one of the vet techs told me they weren’t sure he was going to make it that first weekend (our appointment was Saturday; while they were typically closed on Sunday, they had this staffer with him around-the-clock, doing regular debriding they didn’t tell me about). The third surgery involved an external fixator I was cleaning multiple times a day. When they found out I was doing this, I was yelled at and told to only clean it once a day. I followed the directions–and another significant infection developed. There were multiple instances of their applying splints in ways that hurt my dog, and I ultimately had to move him to another veterinary ortho practice because the surgeon who performed the surgery, the vet who owned the practice and finally the office manager (who had been the final person who would even respond to my calls and letters) stopped responding. Second and third opinions were that Connor developed a bone infection so severe he might not recover–because a fragment of screw had been left behind from one of the first two surgeries. He ruptured a disk in his back trying to manage the awkward splints the first ortho vet used. The second ortho vet did an MRI–discovering the TWO ruptured disks (one was several years old and had been misdiagnosed by the original vet ortho and sports medicine practice as a “congenital defect”). I went ahead with the spine surgery–within three hours in recovery, Connor pushed the baby-gated pen he was in around a corner. The second surgeon was amazed, and said to me, “Younger dogs who recover perfectly well from this surgery can’t even stand at this point–Connor is rearranging the furniture. I can’t imagine how much better he must feel right now to be doing that.” But the leg wasn’t healing due to the infection, and I finally conceded that, despite my best intentions to give him back his mobility and his life, the decision for TPLO actually made his last year of life miserable and then forced me to put him down. (And I can’t even tell you about the in-home “euthanasia” service–it was so horrible I still weep thinking about what happened there, more than three years later.) With this brief (really!) background, would it be unreasonable of me to file a complaint with the state veterinary licensing board? It’s only now that I realize THEY made mistake after mistake, didn’t fully advise me of the situation and options, and caused me to put my dog through pain and misery that wasn’t going to help him improve. I’ve been really fired up about this complaint this week, but then I read your blog about euthanasia and how clients can be unreasonably cruel, and I need to know if you think there would be anything gained from the practice having to answer for their decisions (which include blaming me and refusing to talk to me or treat my dog until I fully paid them ongoing bills that were supposed to have been covered under the “guarantee” they provided in writing.) I really appreciate your taking the time to read this long post and offer your advice.

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Krista Magnifico
8 months ago

Hello, I am so sorry for you and your dog. I’m sorry that you both had to go through this and I’m also sorry that they made a terrible situation worse. My blog wasn’t intended to be about cruelty, although yes I do mention it happens, but tether my difficultly in knowing what’s best and how to serve my patients first and foremost. I don’t know what kind of advice to give you. I will tell you that we created the storylines section (the tab for it is above) so that anyone and everyone can share their pets experiences so… Read more »

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Willow | 1 year ago
Very Ill Senior Cat. I Don’t Know If It’s Time To Say Goodbye. Can I Help Her????

My elderly cat, age 17, recently took a downward spiral with her health. It started with her not eating, then the next day she started becoming more unbalanced, along with sleeping more, and still, eating very little (she also did seem to use the bathroom a tiny bit more than usual, but it wasn’t anything like when my male cat had a urinary tract block, she peed a little each time, but she could be dehydrated) , and today it’s only gotten worse, along with her barely using the litter box, she peed today but no sign of pooing. She ate all of maybe once today, with a few treats here and there. She also has been wandering aimlessly to stare into the bathroom (a place I used to give her water) and to stare at her litter box.
She seems really interested in drinking when she’s up, but doesn’t actually seem to be doing it much. (I’ve debated syringe feeding her some water, but I worry it might hurt her)

She is a cat with a history of feline kidney disease, diagnosed stage 2 by the vet that I’d seen a year ago. Although I have been managing it with daily feedings of wet food and water.

I took her to see the vet today, but all he really did was palpate her kidneys and then tell me he felt something there. I was unable to afford the suggested blood work and x-rays, but the vet was saying things like “everything is hospice care at this point, she’s so old, there not much worth putting the money into her at her age.” Wich was a bit callous sounding. But maybe it’s because she’s my baby.
So they suggested I consider euthanasia right then and there. I couldn’t go through with it right that moment and just took her home to decide.
She has eaten a little, and drank a little since. I’ve been putting her in her bed near me as she’s super tired.

Would putting her down be the right decision? Is there something else I can do???? She’s my only family, and pretty much my child. I can’t just give up on her. Please help.

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Sarah
1 year ago

Hi- I am so sorry that you are going through this difficult time. Only you can decide when is right for you….I like to think that our pets let us know when it is time. If I were you, I would see how the rest of this evening goes and see if she peeks up any tomorrow. Try getting her to eat better and drink some. Very best to you

Krista Magnifico
1 year ago

Hello, I’m so sorrry to hear about your cat. I think it would be really helpful to run some blood work. I always worry about kidney disease and they round disease in these cats. At my clinic this costs about $175. I say this because thyroid disease is treatable. It is best treated early than late. Kidney disease in Advanced stage is not. But I do think that knowing what is going on with her will help make a hard decision a little clearer Also your cat deserves fluid therapy. That is $25 at my clinic for a Sq fluid… Read more »

Laura
1 year ago
Reply to  Willow

Hi Willow – the subcutaneous fluids really are a better option, as they do a better job than just ingested fluids.

If you aren’t feeding a veterinary diet including kidney specific wet food, I’d start. My cat is also in renal failure and simply switching diets and doing subq fluids (when he lets me) have likely bought me more time with him.

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Josephine | 1 year ago
Hi, I Have A 16 Yr Old Shih Tzu That Has Had Brain Tumour Surgery But Had …

Hi, I have a 16 yr old shih tzu that has had brain tumour surgery but had complication of regrowth of a cyst several times and went for fine needle cyst drainage quite a few times. She has degraded to the point of being totally non-ambulatory except for some head movements. She has to have her urine and stools expressed everytime and she has to be handfed. But she still eats very very well. I need advise on what my pet needs at this point and whether is there any reason/last wish that is making her hang on so dearly to her life despite her quality of life and body already failing her? Shes like a family. i am torn between keeping her alive and letting her go if shes suffering but my love for her and our bonds is muddling my thoughts and decisions. I have taken care of her intensely for almost a year now from prior surgery to post surgery and she had so many complications, cyst regowth several times, loss n regain limbs ability, pneumonia, anemia. She always pulled through but now shes at a stage where shes really just hanging onto her dear life i feel, lying the whole day, only able to move her head during mealtimes when she is hungry. I have spent over 30 thousand dollars this while for her medications and procedures and vet visits, she even goes for rehab/pt/accupuncture and hyperbaric which are very costly. It has gotten to a point that I am spending more than I earned every month on her rehab (even though she cannot move, she still does ultrasound therapy on her severely arthritic joints and some accupuncture to relieve any pain from not moving everyday and her mountain of medications and supplements. I really cannot imagine life without her, she is my pillar of hope and support in my dark and depressed life and family full of issues. Now my pillar is crumbling. I still take care of her, i dont care about my finances, i stopped going out except to work, i bring her everywhere whenever i can in a dog pram she just lies motionless. Its amazing how she would wake and eat so very very well and finish all her big plate of food every day twice a day but lies motionless and tired after that. Its amazing how she would use her whatever remaining energy to poop when i try to rub and stimulate her anus once everyday without fail. She would be so tired after all that. It kills me to see her like this. Before that she can move n walk or at least drag ard the hse n look happy still so its ok worth all these. I wake up 3 4 times every night to help her drink water eat snacks she would wake from hunger and pant everynight even now maybe from prednisolone. But now shes just motionless and heart murmur has reached grade 5 or 6 and anemic and totally cannot move at all but still eats super well and pee poo normal with help express. A part of me feels like euthanasing her to end her misery and my own heartache seeing her suffer yet i cant bring myself to do it thinking that she would be reallly gone and that i might have done it wrong because shes still wants to be ard and live that is why she is hanging on so dearly. Please advice me..please. i am so loss and torn between choices its killing me every moment im awake.

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Krista Magnifico
1 year ago

hello,
this question was answered elsewhere. I applaud you for your dedication and devotion to your pup. You have gone above and beyond. i wish you well,

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Krista Magnifico | 2 years ago
Mass Removal In An Older Dog With Kidney Disease
Treatment Cost (USD): $976.90
Riesling is an older lab with elevated kidney enzymes. She presented months earlier with a suspected benign mammary mass. The mass was slow growing, not bothersome, and her pet parents were worried about her ability to tolerate anesthesia, so they watched, hoped and waited. Suddenly the mass began to grow rapidly. It burst late one weekend evening. It was bandaged but because the mass was not normal healthy tissue the bleeding and ulcerative lesion would not/could not be stopped.
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Nidia Rodriguez | 2 years ago
My Dog Was Diagnosed Five Weeks Ago With IVDD And I Chose Conservative Treatment For…

My dog was diagnosed five weeks ago with IVDD and I chose conservative treatment for 8-12 weeks. She got worse everyday and by week four I had to feed her by syringe and by the fifth week she stopped eating all together. The pain grew stronger and she lost all mobility in her hind legs and her front legs. Now, I can’t get her to eat at all and she’s getting weaker every day.

Is this normal for week five and when should I consider euthanasia?

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Krista Magnifico
2 years ago

Hello,
I’m sorry to hear about your dog. You absolutely need to see a veterinarian or a veterinary neurologist ASAP. This is critical that she see someone today. Tomorrow morning at the latest. Only they can tell you whether euthanasia is the best option for her.

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Patricia Rattray | 2 years ago
I Want To Post A Question About My Cat. I Was Touched And Encouraged To…

I want to post a question about my cat. I was touched and encouraged to find Dr. Magnifico’s blog as I am caring for my soon to be nineteen-year-old cat who has bone cancer in her right pelvis. She was diagnosed at the beginning of August and I have been fighting it and managing her pain with homeopathy (which I have studied for three years). I believe I have been managing her pain as she lays in relaxed postures, purrs, still “screeches” hungrily for breakfast in the morning (which has been liquid for a long time) and also “chirps” hello in the morning and when I come into the room. At times her muscles and body posture have become tense which I take as a sign of pain and adjust her medicine or give more and this always seems to work to bring her back to looking and acting comfortable.

Although the homeopathy appears to work for pain management, it has not stopped the progression of the cancer which at this point has impinged on her spinal column causing her to drag her right leg when hobbling and be unable to express her urine and bowel movements. I was taught by a veterinarian during my last visit to manually express her urine. When this doesn’t work, I just change the mattress pads in her bed. The problem is bowel which is stuck in her colon. The vet I took her to said the procedure to remove it manually would be too difficult on her and just encouraged me toward euthanasia. Her life force is still too strong for me to consider this.

The vet did tell me a week and a half ago that the piece of bowel stuck near the opening was about three inches long and suggested soap suds enemas and massage. I have been trying this twice a day with no results. The piece of bowel is wide at the opening and too long for me to reach in with a finger and guide it out complicated by the fact that I don’t really know what I am doing. Worrying about too many soap suds enemas, I have changed to coconut oil and water or just coconut oil.

I found this advice at https://www.handicappedpets.com/bowel-management-in-incontinent-pets/

Squeezing method
Making your dog poop on command squeezing method
Use your fingertips to gently press and feel the soft tissue in a circular area around the anus. By pressing on the soft tissue, you may feel something firm inside the rectum. Spread your thumb and forefinger about 1 1/2″ apart, lay them on either side of the rectum, press inward on the soft tissue a little, and grip the stool right through the skin. Now you’ve got a good amount of skin and soft tissue pinched between your fingers and in the center of it is a piece of stool. If you pinch harder, the stool will break off within the rectum and the anus will open at the same time, and it naturally begins to come out. The beauty of this is that usually the remaining stool moves forward into position and you can repeat the procedure. Repeat until there is nothing inside the soft tissue. One thing I try to be careful about is not pinching too hard. I read somewhere about damaging the mucosa lining the colon. I also don’t want to prolapse the rectum. I keep a box of kleenex on the expressing station, and each time a piece of stool drops, I drop a tissue over it, which reduces the odor. You may go through a lot of kleenex this way, but I feel it’s worth it.

Is this something that would be safe to try on her?

My other question is: she continues to eat three meals a day which are blended raw chicken with a lot of added water and also pumpkin. I think it has been six weeks since she had a bowel movement. This cannot be good and I’m afraid this is what will be life-threatening before the cancer. Am I correct?

Thank you so much,
Patricia

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Krista Magnifico
2 years ago

Hello! First she has to be emptied. In my opinion I would find a feline expert (call around or do a google search) to help you. I use warm water enemas and digital and abdominal palpation to break it up and move it. I also strongly recommend iv fluids for a few days to help stimulate the go tract and break up and soften the feces. Also it is imperative to understand if her disease process is the cause of the colons lack of motility. Of it is this is only a very temporary treatment and you will be back… Read more »

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Diana I | 3 years ago
Female Budgie Has Overgrown Beak For Long Time, The Contacted Vet Refused To Help And…

Female budgie has overgrown beak for long time, the contacted vet refused to help and recommended euthanasia. Budgie has no other symptoms, however she constantly lays unfertilised eggs and spends time in nesting box for whole year. Can be overgrown beak connected with pregnancy or is there some other possible cause like hepatic lipidosis or sinusitis, mites etc.? Is it treatable or the only treatment is regular cutting of beak? Which specific tests would you do to find the cause?

Please don’t send me to visit another vet, but tell me YOUR opinion, your recommendations. According to you, what may be the causes and what examinations would you do to uncover them? Thank you for helpful answer! 🙂

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Kate McKelvie
2 years ago

If you haven’t tried a cuttle bone and a rough perch for her to scrape her beak on, those will help keep the beak in shape. It’s not expensive to have her beak cut back by a vet that treats avians. I hope you have found a happy resolution!

Sarah
2 years ago

I know that you asked not to be advised to seek another vet, but in my option, that is exactly what I would do. Best of luck.

Laura
2 years ago

I’m sorry, Diana, but I don’t think we have any avian vets on here.