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jessica | 3 months ago
Recurring Anal/Rectal Prolapse In Kitten

We just began an adoption trial with an adorable 4 month old kitten named Georgia. She’s very playful and happy but we instantly realized a few things seemed off with her health.

She’s got a watery eye, sneezes occasionally, scratches a lot, shakes her head occasionally, has a lot of gas, has diarrhea on and off, and is dealing with some mild bowel incontinence. But, most concerningly, seems to be dealing with a recurring anal or rectal prolapse.

We’ve taken her to two vets where she’s been given full examinations and deemed healthy. She has had two fecal tests, which return good results – no parasites are seen. She has prescription eye drops, a prescription antibiotic, prescription canned food, and a probiotic that we’ve just started. But no one seems to be as concerned about this rectal issue as we are.

Throughout the day, we notice a tiny bit of pink tissue poking out of her rectum. It’s very small and comes and goes. She also passes gas when this happens. And sometimes poop leaks out. She licks her butt a lot too.

Sometimes a cylindrical round bit of red tissue protrudes much further and what looks like a piece of poop can be seen poking out too. This tends to happen most often when she wakes up from a nap. It seems that her muscles relax and her bowel starts to come out. It will be out for seconds to a few minutes after she gets up and is moving around and then it pushes itself back in. It’s very disturbing to see!

We already have one special needs cat and, while we absolutely love this kitten and want to keep her, I’m afraid that this is going to be a recurring issue that will become very stressful. The vets we’ve seen are trying to treat the underlying cause, which they assume is diarrhea. But I’ve read that some parasites don’t show up on fecal exams or under microscopes – is this true? I’ve also read that stitches and surgery can help if this doesn’t improve on its own but that, with some cats, this is just a recurring problem throughout their lives.

Help! 🙂

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Krista Magnifico
3 months ago

Hello, I think that almost everything you are worried about it fairly normal for a newly adopted kitten. I always tell clients that we put these guys through a tremendously stressful time when we move them away from their family and into a new home. It’s a huge advisement and with that the immune system gets totally stressed out. Upper respiratory infections are a very common sequela. Also most kittens come with parasites. I send out at least three fecals before I deem them to be parasite free. Also stay on a good kitten food. Between the change in homes,… Read more »

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Jennifer Taylor | 6 months ago
In June My Labrador Developed A Lesion On Her Side. She Was Treated With Antibiotics And …

In June my Labrador developed a lesion on her side. She was treated with antibiotics and a medicated shampoo with no success. Her hair started thinning and she developed a lesion on the opposite side. Bloodwork was run to test for Cushings which was negative. As she started to take a Cushings type appearance her docs followed up with an ultrasound. In October she had a punch biopsy. She was treated with Apoquel with no improvement. She has lesions on her chest, both sides near her hips and one near her hind end. I have never seen her itching or chewing. The lesions are crusty and pretty dense. Hair loss is only on her trunk.
A little history: my dog is 10 1/2, has spay induced incontinence, history of frequent UTI’s, frequent urination, and megaesophagus. She is on Dasuquin, Cranmate and Welactin. Despite her plethora of health issues she has never had skin issues. Typically her coat is blue-black, thick and shiny.
She doesn’t seem to be uncomfortable but she seems to have a pretty high pain threshold.
Thank you for your time.

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Brittany | 1 year ago
We Rescued Our Almost 2 Year Old Dog In Early January. She Was Spade In November I …

We rescued our almost 2 year old dog in early January. She was spade in November I believe. In late February she was diagnosed with a UTI and has seemed to have issues ever since. She was given medicine for her UTI and as soon as she finished she seemed to have some more dribbling at times, and straining and not a large production of urine. We took her to the vet and they said there was some formation of crystals, her PH was high, and they recommended notto do a certain kind of testing (I can’t remember what) because she just came off antibiotics and said it wouldn’t yield true results. They said we could do a blood test and X-ray, but I wasn’t sure it was necessary. A few days later she had what I believe they called large intestine diarrhea and needed medication for that. She just finished the medication and probiotic for that this week and now she is having some dribbling or puddling issues. I noticed it yesterday, but I thought my son just scared her with his toy. Today, it was after coming in from a walk. She was laying down and peed a small puddle. She has been drinking plenty and goes to the bathroom and produces a normal amount of urine, she doesn’t seem to strain at all. Not sure if I should call the vet and what kind of tests she should get moving forward. It is getting very expensive and I can’t keep spending almost $200 for each vet visit.

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Laura
1 year ago

I think I’d get a second opinion.

I’d also wonder if this is spay incontinence with other issues happening.

Krista Magnifico
1 year ago

Hello, It seems like there are a few things going on here and I am not sure if any of them are related. I absolutely think that the urinary issue needs follow up and better assistance from your vet in both the immediate and long run. I think that a urinary diet is a good place to start talking to your vet. Also a urine culture and sensitivity and rechecking the urine sample before and after every antibiotic is given. Spay induced incontinence is a possibility but you have to treat and address infection before starting any medication. Also talk… Read more »

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Sunny Warfield | 2 years ago
How Do I Know When It’s Time To Let Go Of My Dog? My Baby…

How do I know when it’s time to let go of my dog? My Baby is a 17yo Shih Tzu, she is blind and deaf now. She has a great appetite but has and is lossing so much weight. She is skin and bones. She can barely stand and walk without constantly falling over. She is incontinent of her bowels and urine more in the last week, before she was able to go 4-6 hours before peeing all over herself. She is groaning a lot lately, normally she doesn’t make any sounds unless we accidently cause her pain. I don’t know what I should do? I don’t want to make her suffer. Please help me

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Sarah
2 years ago

Good morning- I am so sorry that you are going through this right now. This is a delicate situation that is different for everyone. Sometimes our pets tell us. Most times I guess, but we just aren’t ready to listen. I would chat with my vet. They can help you weigh the options. If your dog is miserable with pain, has lost the will to live, doesn’t enjoy anything that they used to, can’t control their own body anymore, then it might be time. Your vet can help you with that discussion.

Sarah
2 years ago

Good morning- I am so sorry that you are going through this right now. This is a delicate situation that is different for everyone. Sometimes our pets tell us. Most times I guess, but we just aren’t ready to listen. I would chat with my vet. They can help you weigh the options. If your dog is miserable with pain, has lost the will to live, doesn’t enjoy anything that they used to, can’t control their own body anymore, then it might be time. Your vet can help you with that discussion.

Laura
2 years ago

I would call your vet. We don’t know anything about your dog, and your vet is your best contact here. Based on this description, however, I would be planning to let her go soon.

I’m sorry. This is a hard decision to make, but we *must* make it for our pets’ welfare.

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RL | 2 years ago
8 Year Old Dachshund Paralyzed With IVDD. Surgery Still An Option? My 8 Year Old…

8 year old Dachshund paralyzed with IVDD. Surgery still an option?

My 8 year old dachshund became paralyzed late last year. This is his second episode. The first time, we had the funds available to quickly get him back surgery and he fully recovered. This time, we just didn’t have the cash so we opted for the conservative method, and have been taking him to physical therapy, treating him with gabapentin and trying to keep his quality of life as good as we can. He is incontinent- he can hold in his urine but not release at will. The last neuro check up we had (2 months ago) they said he was difficult to read and very stoic, so they couldn’t tell if he had deep pain sensation or the ability to move his legs on his own.

We now have enough funds to afford the surgery, but it’s been nearly 6 months. Is it still possible that this would have any benefit? His incontinence and general high needs is starting to wear on me, and he’s now self harming. I don’t know what else to do to help him.

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Krista Magnifico
2 years ago

Hello,
I would discuss all options with the neurologist. Only they can help you answer this.

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Jennifer Taylor | 2 years ago
Roxy Needed A Second Opinion For Frequent Urination & Increased Thirst
Treatment Cost (USD): $1218.00
Frequent urination since October 2018 and increased thirst, history of frequent urinary tract infections, blood in urine and spay induced incontinence. In January of 2018 she began vomiting stomach contents within 5 minutes of eating a meal and also began having periods of confusion.
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Kayleigh Sullins | 3 years ago
Hi. My Dog Daisy Has Hurt Herself And Has Not Been Able To Walk Or…

Hi. My dog Daisy has hurt herself and has not been able to walk or use her back legs. After advice and a little time we took her to get x rays. She does not have a fracture so i asume the next possibility is a disc injury. The vet has referred us to a specialist in akron for surgery and recomended that we should not wait more than 12 to 24 hours. This is not possible for my family. The vet also said that she is incontinent due to nerve damage but i have done some research on injuried disc and it seems to only be a problem if they are not urinating or deficating which my dog has been doing both. I believe this is because she can not get up to go outside so we have kept pee pads under her and we clean her every time she goes. If she had a stroke i believe she should have improved on her own by now. If she has injured her disc (possibly thoracic area) is there any non surgical options? Could we keep her on bed rest and possibly some at home physical therapy? She doesnt seem to be in any unbearable pain as long as we contiue to give her meds ( Tramadol 50mg, Prednisone 20mg, Methocarbamol 500mg, Gabapentin 100mg). I do not want to just give up on her and put her down as she is still young and just this morning she tried to jump up after getting excited but i quickly stopped her because it can still be painful to flip her if we touch the wrong spot. Because of the way she was positioned when i walked in the room she lifted her head/neck backwards and it seems to be a good sign of mobility. Her back legs are the only problem. Any advice would help. Thank you.

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Sarah
3 years ago

Hi there- Have you spoken to your vet about exploring all options? Or have they been able to direct you to someone who might be able to help or online videos that they were able to recommend? I would make a list of the information you have gathered and call the vet to have a discussion about all possible options. They are the one who knows the situation closely and would hopefully be able to point you in a good direction. Having said that, I do know that there are some true experts that visit pawbly and most likely will… Read more »

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Nicole Thornton | 3 years ago
I Recently Began Fostering A Kitten That I Hope To Adopt. She Has Atresia Ani…

I recently began fostering a kitten that I hope to adopt. She has atresia ani and a stricture in her rectum. She had corrective surgery 4 months ago and is doing much better. She can now use the litter box but she still has frequent poop droppings. She is currently being given lysine, probiotics and omega-3 supplements with her kitten wet and dry food. I won’t be able to keep her if the fecal incontinence continues at this rate. So I wondering if there was anything I could do to stop this? Can she have surgery again? Can a change in diet help her? I would like to switch her to a raw diet because the rest of my cats are on it and are doing great. However, I wasn’t sure if she would be able to tolerate the change. Can she eat a raw diet or will it cause constipation since raw food makes the fecal harder? If she can’t eat raw food can you recommend a diet for her? Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

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Krista Magnifico
3 years ago

Hello, I’m sorry but I can’t answer any of these questions. THey are too specific to your cat and providing advice always has the potential to be detrimental most concerningly if we aren’t familiar with the patient. I think it’s so amazing that you had this treated and that he is able to pass feces. The incontinence is usually to be expected. I hope that you can find it in your heart to love him inspite of his disabilities. I’m sure he needs to have you on his side to survive this. There is certainly a chance he will become… Read more »

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Nadine Villanueva | 4 years ago
Hi This Question Is For Dr. Magnifico And Her Associates. My Name Is Nadine And…

Hi this question is for Dr. Magnifico and her associates. My name is Nadine and I live in Chicago. I recently visited my parents residence in georgia and just a couple days prior to my visit their beloved 11 year-old Bichon Frise developed IVDD and she is now paralyzed and incontinent. I hardly got any sleep over the holiday weekend because I was taking care of her and was overwhelmed with how much pain she is in. My parents took her to two vets and the diagnosis was the same and medicines were prescribed but it is tough because “Sofia” is very resistant to taking them no matter how it is administered. My parents are going to the university of georgia veterinary hospital to inquire about surgical treatment, but my question is do you specifically board dogs with this condition? My family and I were so impressed with your work with Hank and it made us hopeful.
Thank you so much for taking the time to read this.
—Nadine

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Krista Magnifico
3 years ago

Hello, I’m sorry to hear about your parents pup. I think that the university is your best bet. You can also inquire about having the medications formulated into a chewable or oral liquid. It also might help to ask for a fentanyl patch to alleviate the pain. As far as boarding goes these pets need 24/7 care so I wouldn’t board anywhere unless it is a 24 hour hospital. Or local ER provides medical boarding for patients like yours. Ask around. Find a vet tech who might be able to help. Or ask your vet for another client who has… Read more »

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Kelly Renart | 4 years ago
My Frenchie Had Ivdd Surgery 3 Weeks Ago She Has Paralysis Of Both Hind Legs…

My Frenchie had ivdd surgery 3 weeks ago she has paralysis of both hind legs and is incontinent. We just had recheck today and vet said there is no change is he doesn’t think that’s a good sign. He was talking about euthanizibg her if her condition doesn’t change in 6 months. I don’t know if I’m being unrealistic or am I holding on to hope. I have read that some dogs go regsin function again. I’m bringing her for accupuncture but don’t see any change

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Julie Brader
3 years ago

I’m sorry to hear this and hope your dog improves. However the decision of euthanasia is yours alone. I personally know two dogs in this situation. Their owners have learnt to care for them very well, and the dogs still have quality of life and mobility with the use of wheels. It would be worth looking at dodgerslist.com a website dedicated to IVDD where you will find expert advice and support. Don’t give up yet, there is still hope.

Julie Brader
3 years ago

I’m pleased we could be of some help Kelly. I’m also sorry you feel upset with the surgeon. I don’t know if you were referred to a Neurologist but this is very dedicate surgery indeed. It takes a Specialist to perform it. I agree it is far too soon to make any decisions. Its still very early days. Please do let us know how things are. Don’t give up.

Krista Magnifico
3 years ago

Hello,
I’m sorry to hear about your pup. I, not can anyone else, tell you what the future holds. In some cases these pups improve, in others they don’t. Quality of life depends on the eyes of those who care for them. I have quite a few clients who care for their paralyzed pets very well.