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Amanda Kasecamp | 10 years ago
How Can I Tell If My English Bulldog Who Is 50lbs Has Worms?

How can I tell if my English bulldog who is 50lbs has worms?

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Amanda,

    Thanks for your question.

    This is a very important question and a cornerstone to maintainting optimal health in dogs, cats, and well, all of our domestic pets.

    The best way to check for intestinal worms is by bringing a fecal sample to your veterinarian.

    At our clinic we check fecal samples with every annual physical examination. Many times we find little surprises in our pets stool sample without any clinical signs, like diarrhea, or scooting, or even seeing worms.

    Many people tell me that they don’t think they need to send their pets fecal sample in because they aren’t seeing any worms in the feces. The intestinal worms that the fecal sample looks for are in fact the microscopic evidence of intestinal worms. The fecal sample is examined under a microscope for the intestinal worms eggs. Teeny-tiny worm eggs are not visible to us, and you cannot see them wiggling around in the pets poop. When I have had people call and tell me that they are indeed seeing worms crawling around in their pets feces, I always have to ask where they saw the poop, the worms, and when? I know that all sounds gross, but in almost all cases the worms have been seen in many day old poop in the owners yard. Thosethat they are seeing are infact worms that have migrated up from the earth and found their buffett bar in your pets excrement. They didn’t come from inside your pet, they came from your environment.

    So, the point is, when you bring a fecal sample in to your vet it has to be fresh. The fecal sample needs to be picked up soon after your pet deposits it. Put it in a sealed container and drop it at the vets within a day.

    A good final note: At our clinic we remind our clients that keeping your pet on monthly heartworm pills will treat, prevent, or control many of the most common intestinal worms.
    Ask your vet about which kind of heartworm prevention they recommend and how this product protects your pet from intestinal worms.

    If you have any other questions, or need clarification on this topic, please bring your bulldog in to see your veterinarian, or visit me at Jarrettsville Vet, in Jarrettsville MD.

    Sincerely,
    Krista Magnifico, DVM
    owner Jarrettsville Vet, Jarrettsville MD
    http://www.jarrettsvillevet.com
    twitter, FreePetAdvice

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Michelle Molinaro | 10 years ago
Hello. My Name Is Michelle And I Have A 4 Year Old 140lb Great Dane…

Hello. My name is Michelle and I have a 4 year old 140lb great dane who recently started to have hip issues. I have seen my vet over the past year for this and was trying to treat it with supplements and a grain free diet with pain pills occasionally. The problem has increasingly gotten worse to the point where he can barely walk. He shows significant atrophy in both legs and is only comfortable while standing or sitting (does not like to lay down so is not sleeping well). My vet wants to put him asleep to do xrays and is saying it will cost between $550 and $650 just for the xrays and for someone to read them. Through research it is pretty clear to me that he will need some form of surgery to repair the problem. I’m lost on what to do because knowing that he will most likely need surgery, I’d rather save the money for the xrays and just go right in and fix it all. However, I do know xrays are needed to assess the severity of his condition. Is it possible to just go directly to a specialist to save the time and money or do you need a referral from a vet? Will they know without xrays if he will need surgery and what kind? Please help me on what steps to take, it is just breaking my heart to watch my boy go through so much pain.

3 Responses

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello!!

    Welcome to Pawbly and thanks for your question.

    I am sorry to hear of your Danes problems.

    There are a few good aspects of your dogs case to discuss.

    First, I assume your dog is not overweight? And that you are on a very good high quality diet. I’m not sure why grain free? Or what that has to do with his condition?

    And two that he is on a joint supplement, I like Dasaquin, from Nutramaxx, available over the counter. Also I would recommend asking your vet about an NSAID for pain.

    The cost of the X-ray should also be discussed with your vet. I often try to take them without sedation or general anesthesia but sometimes the pets are too painful to do without something onboard like a sedative or anesthesia.

    Maybe your vet would be willing to try to take an X-ray with-without sedation before trying general anesthesia? And perhaps the X-rays don’t need to be sent out for a referral? I usually send the X-ray that I take at my clinic to the referral surgical center only.

    If you ever have any issues try to talk to your vet about them. We are all here to help you AND your pet.

    If the hips are significantly displaced then surgery will likely be your best option but an orthopedic surgeon can discuss ALL the treatment options with you so I think a visit to them is a great next option.

    There are braces available but they are also expensive and not as beneficial as surgery in almost all cases.

    I applaud your determination to find a resolution to his condition. And I wish you the very best of luck.

    Sincerely
    Krista Magnifico DVM
    Jarrettsville Vet Center
    Jarrettsville MD

    Pls don’t hesitate to reply if I can be of any additional help.

  2. Michelle Molinaro Post author

    Krista,

    Thank you so much for the quick response. We have tried every supplement under the sun and he is currently on two pain medications to try and curb how he feels. He is definitely not overweight (maybe even a little underweight due to the pain). He is on a grain-free diet because he has allergies and also when he eats bad food it directly affects the pain level he is in.

    With regards to the xrays he did initially try to do them without anesthesia but my dog (Rommell is his name) would get agressive when he got near the hip area. So they sent me an invoice with all of the info for the xrays. When I got the numbers I was so upset that I called to see if it was possible if we could give him some form of a pill just to calm him down before the xrays and for an explination of the invoice. They broke it down but I am not sure if the stuff they said was necessary and they said a pill to calm him would not be possible because of his size. Also, they gave me a low and high price and they couldn’t exactly tell me which one it would be or why. I am currently possibly looking for a different vet to handle this situation. I love my vet but this is very serious and he is the only doctor in the office.

    This is the items and the price list they gave me. Maybe you can tell me what this all means and if it is necessary:

    Hospitalization Level One – Low quality: 1 Low ammount: $36 High quality: 1 High amount: $43.20
    Butorphanol Pain Relief Injection – Low quality: 1.4 Low ammount: $53.09 High quality: 1.4 High amount: $53.09
    Dexmedetomidine Heavy Sedation Inject. – Low quality: .3 Low ammount: $50 High quality: 1 High amount: $60.68
    Atipamezole Heavy Sedation Reversal – Low quality: .3 Low ammount: $25 High quality: 1 High amount: $25.68
    Three (3) View Xray Study – Low quality: 1 Low ammount: $200 High quality: 1.5 High amount: $300
    Radiologist Consult fee/Second Opinion – Low quality: 1 Low ammount: $108 High quality: 1 High amount: $108
    Preventative Health Chem.Screen/CBC – Low quality: 1 Low ammount: $95 High quality: 1 High amount: $95

    So what do you think is the best step? Should I go directly to the orthopedic to assess the severity of the situation or should I choose another vet to do the xrays then go from there? I have been considering going to Jarrettsville Vet because my brother works there but I get all nervous swtiching because I have had 2 prior horrible experiences with Rommell at other vets because of his size.

    I’m sorry to type so much but I have never had to deal with this and I’m just lost on the best course of action. Thank you for your time reading this ridiculously long email!

  3. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Again,

    Never hesitate to get a second opinion.

    I always want my clients to feel comfortable with all of the information and decisions they make.

    We would love to meet you and Rommel. And we would be happy to go over any and all concerns that you have.

    It sounds like he definately needs some help.

    The estimate is not something I can review with you here. But any vet visit you make should clarify their choices and your options clearly and help you to make the right decision for you and your pet.

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linda sarubin | 10 years ago
One Of My Dogs…small Miniature Poodle..is On A Very Restricted Diet Because Of Allergies/seizures…it Is…

one of my dogs…small miniature poodle..is on a very restricted diet because of allergies/seizures…it is really helping, thank goodness! i want to be able to give him something to chew on…would rawhide bones, or something like that go against his strict eating plan? thanks!

1 Response

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Linda,

    This is a great question!

    It will be hard to give you advice on what to feed without knowing what restricted diet your pup is on. This is a great question to ask your vet at your next visit, (or call and ask them to call you back to discuss or see if they have a way for you to email this question).

    Sometimes you can use the regular diet as a snack. Some of the restricted diets are available in canned varieties, and sometimes you can even bake the canned food so it more closely resembles a biscuit. Another option is to make your own treat, but please only do this under veterinary supervision so that the diet doesn’t stray away from being ‘restricted’.

    Rawhide is made from beef or pork, so if these are not a part of your restricted diet you cannot use them as treats.

    For chewing, you can try a non-protein based dog toy. See your local pet stores for possible options.

    I hope this helps.

    Best of luck with your continued success and living a seizure-free life.

    Sincerely,
    Krista Magnifico, DVM
    Owner Jarrettsville Veterinary Center
    Jarrettsville MD

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linda sarubin | 10 years ago
How Often Should My Dogs Get Bathed? I Have Two Miniature Poodles And I…

how often should my dogs get bathed? i have two miniature poodles and i take them to be profesionally groomed every six weeks, but i feel like they get a little dusty/grimy in the interim…should i be bathing them? also…..in the cold weather, i always put sweaters on them, but my husband says i am being silly….who’s right? i don’t want them to be cold!
thanks,

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello,

    Thanks for your questions.

    In general healthy dogs don’t need to be bathed frequently. Certainly dogs with skin infections or parasites may need some topical treatments, sometimes in conjunction with baths, or medicated baths, but every 6-8 weeks is the usual frequency for dogs like poodles who need their coats trimmed.
    If your dogs get dirty (mine like to roll in poop if they can find it, yucky dirty, and always need a bath after), then a shampoo for dogs, used as directed, is what I would recommend. Please ask your vet what kind of shampoo would be best for your dogs. I use a doggie oatmeal shampoo for mine.

    As far as the sweaters go, I think it’s adorable to dress them up, but please change them daily and inspect your dogs everyday. I have seen skin infections develop because dogs are wearing clothes that bind or get dirty and trap moisture and infection between the clothes and your pets skin.

    If your pets can move freely and are comfortable with the clothes on then enjoy!

    Please see your veterinarian or groomer for any specific questions.

    Thanks Again for asking!
    Krista Magnifico, DVM
    Jarrettsville Veterinary Center

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linda sarubin | 53 years ago
How Often Should You Brush A Dog’s Teeth?

how often should you brush a dog’s teeth?

3 Responses

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Linda,

    Thanks for asking such an important question! Did you know that February is national pet dental month?

    Studies have shown that dog’s should have their teeth brushed more than 4 times a week. There was no benefit seen to dogs if they were brushed less than twice a week show no long term benefit. I know that seems like a difficult thing to fit into our already over booked days, but if we can help you make it a simple, easy, and stress-free part of your routine, then it’s not insurmountable,is it? Well, for me, that’s always my objective. I know that if your pet hates it, you will hate it, and then it doesn’t happen.

    So I try to make brushing teeth a very simple, quick, and easy task for everyone involved.

    First, I have to admit that I don’t use any expensive or elaborate toothpaste or brushes to do my dogs teeth. I use my finger with either inexpensive cotton gauze wrapped around it, or a small finger brush to massage the teeth and gums on the inside of the upper lip. A few small circles with your finger to loosen and brush off the yellow debris (called calculi) is all that is needed. I find that big brushes and lots of flavored paste just end up causing my dog to chew on my obtrusive finger. I also think that using your other hand to hold the muzzle helps. It is usually not necessary to clean the other tooth surfaces as the pets tongue does that for you. This advice may change if your pet has had extractions, or has a propensity to accumulate calculi quickly. Also, don’t let your pet get worked up or anxious about it. Keep things calm, be patient, and use the reward system.

    In general, the smaller dogs seem to need more dental care than the larger dogs. I have seen some poodles, chihuahuas, and toy breeds need a full dental cleaning, and even extractions at two years of age. I have also seen labs that never ever need a tooth brush or dental cleaning. So if you have a smaller breed dog ask your veterinarian to review your pets oral cavity exam with you, and ask them to show you any areas of concern as soon as they arise. Like many parts of healthcare treating early disease, or even prevention of disease, is always the goal.

    Some pets need a professional cleaning before routine in home brushing becomes beneficial. If your pets teeth are not bright pearly white from the gum line to the tip of the tooth, or if your pet’s breath is foul smelling, please make an appointment with your veterinarian for a dental exam. I also think that asking your veterinarian at your next visit to review your pets dental findings with you, and asking them what they suggest for your pet to keep their teeth healthy is a great way to keep your pet and their teeth healthy for the rest of their years ahead. An unhealthy mouth can lead to heart disease, and other organ impairment, and who wants kisses from an unhealthy mouth?

    For every pet that I see with any concern of dental disease or intervention I review tips to make brushing easier. At our veterinary clinic the staff is trained to give brushing demonstrations to anyone interested. Ask them, we always have great tips to make it a simple, easy, stress-free, part of your daily routine.

    Thanks for asking such a great question.
    As always let me know if there is any information that you would like clarification or expansion upon, and my best wishes to you and yours.

    Krista Magnifico, DVM
    Jarrettsville Veterinary Center, MD

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linda sarubin | 53 years ago
I Have Two Miniature Poodles. Sometimes That Makes Very Scary Shocking Sounds That I…

i have two miniature poodles. sometimes that makes very scary shocking sounds that i have heard referred to as "reverse cough". what’s the best thing to do for them when this happens? Thanks!

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Linda,

    I think that you are referring to a reverse sneeze?

    If I am unsure that my client and I are speaking of the same thing I ask them to try to catch it on film, (everyone seems to have phones that capture video), and then send it to me to validate that we are both speaking about the same thing. And many times I try to simulate it, (but I have yet to perfect it without looking like a fool).

    A reverse sneeze is a common occurrence in dogs. Although the first time someone sees it they are usually a little frightened by it.

    A reverse sneeze is not a cough or a gag and should not produce vomitus, or anything else, from the mouth. It involves the nose alone. It sounds like air is being sucked in (often violently) into the nose causing the head to go backwards, and the lips to be pulled into the mouth.

    It is usually a benign, often self-limiting event. My beagle puppy will sometimes go into short fits of reverse sneezing. To stop them I put gentle pressure on the nostrils to try to get his mind off of the episode. I tell my clients that it is like hiccups in us humans, (no standing on your head and drinking water!)

    OK, big important caveat: IF your pet has any evidence of infection, blood, pus, or nasal discharge go see your vet immediately! A reverse sneeze is not a concern in many cases but it is imperative that your pet not be the exception to my rule. If you aren’t sure call your vet and ask for help in discerning whether your pet has something more serious.

    Once again, Thanks for asking! Let me know if anything is unclear, and my best to you and your family, 2, 4 and any-legged in between.

    Should you need any help, or have any questions with this please come see me at the clinic.

    Krista Magnifico, DVM
    Jarrettsville Veterinary Center

    See also;
    PetMD for a more thorough discussion and other conditions associated with reverse sneezing;
    http://tinyurl.com/akxfary

    and a reverse sneeze in action, thanks to YouTube
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U3L4v0W2_Sw

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linda sarubin | 53 years ago
I Have An Almost-eight Year Old Miniature Poodle…should I Start Feeding Him A Diet For…

i have an almost-eight year old miniature poodle…should i start feeding him a diet for senior dogs? he has a tendency to be a little bit chunky ( like his mother ) thanks!

1 Response

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello!

    Thanks for asking about your poodles diet!

    In general, the guidelines for classifying a dog as geriatric are based on breed and size. The smaller breeds of dogs live longer than the larger breeds, so I classify a small breed dog as geriatric at about 10 years old.

    There are many wonderful diets now available to just about every size, shape, age, and disease out there. It is incredible how far veterinary nutrition, and equally, interest in it has come.

    Ask your vet at your next annual (or semi-annual for geriatrics) is best for your pet. And remember to ask whether these diets are veterinary exclusive (i.e. require a prescription from your vet), or over the counter.

    Thanks again for asking,

    Please let me know if I can clarify anything, and if you need additional veterinary assistance you can find me at Jarrettsville Veterinary Center. Or ask for assistance from a board certified veterinary nutritionist.

    Krista Magnifico, DVM

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Joe Mccollum | 53 years ago
I Live In PA And Would Like To Know Your Thoughts On Flea Protection. …

I live in PA and would like to know your thoughts on flea protection. My pets both dogs and cats are inside most of the time but do get outside a few hours a day.

1 Response

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Joe,

    Thanks for your question.

    Flea protection is a vital part of protecting our pets in PA. If you reside in a rural part of PA then fleas and ticks are a part of the world that your dogs live in on a daily basis. Most of the commercially available topical flea and tick preventatives, (like Frontline, Advantix, Vectra, etc), are monthly products that protect your pet from the blood sucking ectoparasites that transmit disease, and could possible be lethal. I have seen dogs die from Lyme disease (which s prevalent in PA), because the disease can infiltrate the pets kidneys. In PA I recommend they be applied from March to December. But remember, if we have a warm winter, then you probably need to keep applying them year around.

    Frontline is now available generically, and Advantix is also available over the counter. There are many very good options for effective flea and tick prevention. Please remember to not bathe your dogs for 24-48 hours before and after applying these topical products. They need the oils of the skin to be distributed throughout the skin.

    Also it is a very good idea to ask your veterinarian or veterinary technician to review with you how and where to apply your topical product. I have had a huge number of clients discover that they were not using it correctly, or applying it in the appropriate place.

    Certainly indoor pets are at less of a risk of fleas and ticks then outdoor pets, but it only takes one flea or tick to cause the cascade of skin, joint, and systemic diseases that these little critters can cause. Protecting your pets is the best way to avoid the problems fleas and ticks deliver.

    Ask your veterinarian about the product they recommend.

    Thanks again for asking, Let me know if you need any additional information.

    Sincerely,
    Krista Magnifico, DVM
    owner Jarrettsville Veterinary Center
    Jarrettsville MD

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Carol Ann Leyh | 53 years ago
Our 15 Year Old Terrier Is Showing Signs Of Dog Dementia–pacing, Staring, Etc. I…

Our 15 year old terrier is showing signs of dog dementia–pacing, staring, etc. I read about Anipryl. Will this adversely affect her because she is in the beginning stages of renal failure?

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  1. Carol Ann Leyh Post author

    Hello!!

    Thanks for your question. There are quite a few drugs now available for dementia in dogs, but like all drugs there are potential side effects. Many can be hard on the liver, kidneys, or blood pressure. It is a good idea to discuss any drug and treatment plan with your veterinarian before starting. Also many if these drugs take a few weeks to work.
    I have however seen great improvement with pets placed on them.

    There are also vitamin supplements, anti-oxudants and prescription diets to try.

    Before starting a probable life long drug talk about your pets current diet, supplements, and have a thorough exam and check blood and urine.

    Dementia is often a normal part of aging but it doesn’t have to be a reason for a decreased quality if life.

    Please let me know if you have any other questions to this. And ask for help. There’s a whole lot available to pets these days.

    Goid luck and thanks for asking.

    Sincerely
    Krista Magnifico DVM

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Olivia Reed | 54 years ago
Jolene
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