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Louise Shoemaker | 8 years ago
How Long Does The Parvo Diease Stay In Residents?

How long does the parvo diease stay in residents?

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Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Louise, Thanks for your question. I think that you are asking how long the virus stays active in your environment? OK, here is the scary part. The parvovirus is incredibly difficult to eradicate and can live for months in the environment that it was shed in. It is spread in the feces of the dog that was carrying the disease. Most resources say that the virus can live 5 to 7 months in the environment. The best thing to use to kill it is bleach. Diluted one part of bleach to 30 parts of water, and then clean all… Read more »

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Lynne Freund | 8 years ago
I Know Phenobarbital Causes An Increase In Alkaline Phosphatase, However My Research Says Alk Phos…

I know phenobarbital causes an increase in alkaline phosphatase, however my research says alk phos is not the indicator for liver disease. My dog’s seizures are well controlled on phenobarb but his alk phos is off the wall. He has no symptoms of liver disease. At this point, I would just assume he not have labs drawn anymore unless I knew which ones would yield the most accurate information. Any suggestions? Thanks.

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Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Lynne, I apologize for the delay. The answer was sent a few hours after you asked it but then it appears it never reached you..I sincerely apologize for this… I think that this is a very good question, however, I don’t want to speak for the veterinarian managing your dogs case, so I will give the advice that I would give for one of my clients. It is very common to see an increase in alkaline phosphatase (we call it alk phos), when a pet is on phenobarbital. It usually does not indicate liver disease. The alk phos usually… Read more »

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Shirley Graumann | 8 years ago
Thursday Jan. 24, 2013
Jarrettsville Vet Patient – Itsy Graumann #13182-2

Dr. Magnifico,

Itsy Was Seen By You…

Thursday Jan. 24, 2013
Jarrettsville vet patient – Itsy Graumann #13182-2

Dr. Magnifico,

Itsy was seen by you on 1/8/13 for red gums and ulcers in her month/tongue. I have changed all feeding/drinking dishes to stainless steel and ceramic as per your recommendation. Itsy finished her last tx of prednisolone on Tuesday. There is 50% left in the bottle of prednisolnone. First question – Can I keep the rest for future use and how should I store the the remaining medicine?

Second question – I ordered & received a 360 degree drinkwell pet fountain in plastic vs stainless steel prior to Itsy problem. Should I exchange it for the stainless steel model?

Third question – I would like to take my two 9 month old cats (that I adopted in October) to our cabin in Deep Creek next weekend. They will be in the car for 3 1/2 to 4 hours. My question is can cats travel in a carrier inside a car? I was also looking at buying a fold up cat playpen for the drive. I have never traveled with cats, dogs yes. Will you please advise me on what to do. Thank you for taking the time in anwering my questions.

Shirley Graumann

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Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Shirley! Thanks for the question! First Answer; Yes, please keep the rest of the prednisilone. But remember that this is a steroid so if you resume using it you need to taper the dose before stopping, just like the original prescription..Or, you can always submit another question to me in the future, for help… Seond Answer; I have, and use, and love, my pet fountain. I also have a plasticc one, and when it dies I wil replace it with a ceramic one. But until then I am not going to buy one. Now, if you think that the… Read more »

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Lori Fadely | 8 years ago
My Dog Has Allergies And Dry Skin. The Vet Recommended Benadryl And Fish Oil…

My dog has allergies and dry skin. The vet recommended Benadryl and fish oil. What are your thoughts on coconut oil? thanks Lori

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Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Lori, Thanks for your question. I have to admit that in the last two days I have gotten two questions about coconut oil. Two questions! There must be some coconut farmer out there who has cornered the dog skin supplement market, or did Dr. Oz have a "10 best supplement show?" I don’t know. But I have to admit that I have never heard of any animal nutritionists recommending it, or even discussing it as a potential safe supplement. I know that there is a big buzz in health and fashion side of human products. It is being recommended… Read more »

Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Again, Lori. I did some research with some other online friends. There are many holistic vets who use and love this product! I am soo happy to learn more about coconut oils anti-inflammatory properties. The recommended references sources that I received were;pawnation.com they have a whole article on it and Dr. Beckers (Karen) YouTube video that reviews why she loves this product so much and how she uses it. Dr. Becker is a widely respected holistic and alternative medicine vet. Also, Dogs Naturally Magazine, has published some articles. I hope these help.. And thanks for your question. I hope… Read more »

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Kate Battista | 8 years ago
My Miniature Pinscher Recently Developed Some Sort Of Skin Condition And I Don’t Have Hundreds…

My miniature pinscher recently developed some sort of skin condition and I don’t have hundreds of dollars to spend at the vet trying to figure out what it is. We did have a skin scraping done, with the results of "no mites found." She has severe dandruff, from head to tail. She also has scabs on her ears and legs, and is losing hair from between her eyes, her ears, and her legs. When this first started I had changed her food to a grain free. As soon as I noticed an issue, I changed her food again to a different grain free. The condition continues to get gradually worse so I’ve changed her back to her original food and am now giving her coconut oil twice a day. She was on antibiotics (Clavamox) for 10 days to prevent infection in a bite wound, but it didn’t seem to help. I have three other dogs, one of which has no similiar symptoms at all. The other two both have a very light case of dandruff. My vet wants me to treat it as mange and put her on ivermectin, even though he didn’t see any mites on the scraping. I really don’t want to expose her to unnecessary medication at this point. Is there anything else I can do for her? Are there any other things this could be? My vet said it could be ring worm, but no one else has any of the symptoms, so I’m relucant to spend the $80 (that I really don’t have!!) on the test for it. Please help! I have heard wild alaskan salmon oil is also good for the skin. Can I use this with the coconut oil or is it one or the other?

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Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Kate, Thanks for asking your question. Dermatology is one of the most frustrating animal conditions that we see. I can hear the frustration in your note, and I empathize completely. It sounds as if your dog needs to be seen again by a veterinarian. There are far too many possibilities of what the skin condition could be for me to be able to provide you any direction for treatment. Without a diagnosis of what is causing the skin problem, and we shouldn’t prescribe a treatment plan if we don’t have at least a presumptive diagnosis I know that many… Read more »

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Adam Wysocki | 8 years ago
What’s The Best Type Of Chew Toy For My Dogs?

What’s the best type of chew toy for my dogs?

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Adam Wysocki
6 years ago

This is a great answer!

Adam Wysocki
6 years ago

Just one more comment … thanks!

Adam Wysocki
6 years ago

last comment … for sure

Lora Ledford
6 years ago

How do i ask Adam Wysocki a question?

Lora Ledford
6 years ago

I have a sick puppy & need help?

Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Adam, The ‘best’ chew toy for your dogs is the safest chew toy that your dog likes. There are many great options available but not every dog likes every option. There are the dogs that need to destroy, so we need to pick a safe, ‘can’t break into little pieces and swallow’, option. Other dogs like squeaky, animated options, I call these dogs "the attention seekers." These dogs don’t really want to chew, they want to engage you into playing with them. Some dogs chew because they are bored. I compare them to the people who are trying to… Read more »

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Kelly Furgason | 8 years ago
How Often Should I Trim My Dog’s Nails? They Are Making Sounds On My Wood…

How often should I trim my dog’s nails? They are making sounds on my wood floor, but my groomer says that she can’t trim them any shorter.

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Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Kelly, Dog’s need their nails trimmed as often as they grow long enough to need them trimmed. Dogs that run often, or spend time on hard surfaces, don’t need their nails trimmed much if ever. The dewclaws can grow long if not kept trimmed, and should be monitored for overgrowth. Your veterinarian, or the veterinary staff can show you how to trim your dogs nails, or help guide you on whether they are too long. There are also products, like soft paws, that can be glued onto the nails, to soften the noise the nails may make on your… Read more »

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Kelly Furgason | 8 years ago
My Vet Gave Me Some Antibiotic Pills For My Dog.I Tried Getting Him To Eat…

My vet gave me some antibiotic pills for my dog.I tried getting him to eat the pill in a "pill pocket" without any luck. Do you have any tips to get a dog to take medicine? I don’t feel comfortable putting my hand inside his mouth to force him to take it.

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Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Kelly, Well I have to admit that my first recommendation is usually to try a pill pocket. There is also a trick to them. Some pets have such an incredibly keen sense of smell that they can smell the residue of the pill on your fingers when you place the pill in the pocket. Try to place the pill in the pocket with forceps, then close the pill pocket. You can also try hot dogs, or cat food, or lunch meat. If you continue to have difficulty some antibiotics can be formulated by a specialty pharmacy to be flavored,… Read more »

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3bunnies4me | 8 years ago
How Do You Know When Your Kitty Needs An Anti-anxiety Pill To Help Them Overcome…

How do you know when your kitty needs an anti-anxiety pill to help them overcome tinkling outside the litter box? My little girl is almost 3 and has been on antibiotics, eats dry and wet prescription food (UR), gets Cosequin daily and still has trouble.

She eats from her own bowl, has a water fountain to increase the likelihood of hydration, and has plenty of opportunities outdoors. She clearly has a high level of anxiety about 50 percent of the time though…pacing, switching her tail, hiding, etc. Although she has 5 siblings, we treat her as though she is a little princess.

I’m thinking it’s time to start her on an anti-anxiety tablet. Are these expensive? We are already spending a small fortune on a the special food and Cosequin. Any thoughts?

(PS…Noodle and Banjo have told us about your website). Thank you!

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Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello, Wow-za! this is a whopper. OK, there’s a lot going on here. I think that you probably need to have this conversation with your veterinarian. It sounds like you may have had a history of urinary issues, and these need to be definitively ruled out first. This usually requires blood work, urinalysis, radiographs, and an ultrasound. The most likely cause for inappropriate elimination (our fancy way of saying pees outside of the box) in a pet with a history of urinary issues is more urinary issues. I know you probably don’t want to hear that this is going to… Read more »

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Kelly Furgason | 8 years ago
My Cat Seems To Enjoy Shredding My Couch. What Can I Do To Stop This?

My cat seems to enjoy shredding my couch. What can I do to stop this?

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Krista Magnifico
7 years ago

Hello Kelly, Thanks for the question. It’s a great one! I was just on the phone yesterday talking about this same subject with an old friend who is contemplating de-clawing his cat because she is using their couch as a scratching post. They are understandably frustrated. Your cat scratches your couch for a few reasons.First, cats naturally shed their claws. They do this by using something to help them pull off the outer layer of the nail. The old outer layer soughs off naturally, but to keep them sharp and healthy a nice vertical surface that allows the points to… Read more »