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Susie | 6 years ago
I Have A 7 Month Old Male Puppy He Potty Around The House I Take…

I have a 7 month old male puppy he potty around the house I take him outside to go and I train him too but he still potty So if I get him fix will that work

1 Response

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Susie,

    It sounds like this is more of a case of incomplete puppy housebreaking than anything else.

    Neutering will help reduce marking (where pets leave a small amount of urine in many locations to tell other pets that they are present and to try to claim this territory as their on). But 7 months old is likely too young to be demonstrating this behavior. But leaving large pools of urine (indicating that your puppy is emptying his bladder) is an indication of him not understanding where he is supposed to go to the bathroom OR how to tell you that it is time for him to go.

    There are some puppies who need to urinate more often because of a medical or dietary need, so it is very important to talk to your vet about this. Your vet might want to check a urine sample to make sure that there is not a urinary tract infection or inflammation.

    Here is some information on how to train a puppy..

    Be very consistent, and never ever yell at him, or scold him..If he pees in the house its really only because he hasn’t been taught otherwise. Dogs only want to please their parents, but some need more training and foregiveness than others.

    Best of luck.

    http://kmdvm.blogspot.com/2013/02/housebreaking-your-new-puppy.html

    Krista

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garrett | 6 years ago
I Have A 2 Year Old Female That We Rescued As A Pup. The Mother…

I have a 2 year old female that we rescued as a pup. The mother is lab German Sheppard mix. Our dog looks like there was some dobi as well. She has been diagnosed with Happy tail. we cannot get it to heal and she hits everything and re injures it again. Is tail amputation a safe fix or is there anything else we can look at?

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  1. Eleanor Wood

    Hi,

    Amputation is your best bet as it is a relatively safe operation with good recovery and provides excellent resolution to the problem of Happy Tail! In ten years as a vet I’ve come to the conclusion that it is very unusual for it to resolve without amputation.

    Eleanor Wood
    UK vet

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Susie | 6 years ago
If You Fixed Will It Still Potty All Over The House?

If you fixed will it still potty all over the house?

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  1. Jana Rade

    Susie,

    in general, unless there is a medical issue, pottying in the house is a training issue, not an issue of being fixed or not. How old is the dog? Is he fearful? Is he otherwise healthy? Is he drinking normally? Is this a new issue or something that’s been happening from the start? How did you potty train?

    http://dawgbusiness.blogspot.com

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Natalie Pence | 6 years ago
Hi :) I Have A 13 Month Old 10 Lbs Shih Tzu. Last Night Around…

Hi 🙂 I have a 13 month old 10 lbs Shih Tzu. Last night around 10pm I gave her some sort of chew bone/raw hide and she swallowed the whole thing within a few minutes – it was 2.5" long and 3/4" wide. She has not thrown up. She has urinated but not dedicated since the incident. Her routine is to deficate after she eats in the morning. I gave her a little bit less food than normal this morning. She usually wakes me up around 8am to eat, but she did not this morning – she woke up around 11am with me but was not begging to get out of bed. This could just be a coincidence though. Is this something that will break down and pass or should I take her to the vet? Thank you so much! Natalie

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  1. Jana Rade

    That depends on the chew bone. If it indeed was a pressed raw hide, no, that doesn’t break down and I think that you ARE looking at potential obstruction. There are some that seem to had been ground first and then pressed, those would break apart I think. But whole chunks of raw hide won’t.

    It does soften up so I think it COULD pass through. But I wouldn’t wait too long, particularly if she does start to vomit.

    http://dawgbusiness.blogspot.com

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Amy | 6 years ago
What Is The Best Remedy For Hairballs In Cats? Every Spring My Cats Get…

What is the best remedy for hairballs in cats? Every spring my cats get horrible hairballs, throwing up almost daily. Once shedding season is over it subsides a little bit but they still throw up from time to time.

1 Response

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Amy

    There are a few good options for you.

    First be sure that the problem is hair all related. You may need your vet to help you understand hoe to correctly and accurately identify vomiting in cats ( for example we need to identify vomiting versus regurgitation and be sure that it is a foreign body (hair) versus other problems…. The list is long and wide). If it is determined to be hairballs then I would recommend brushing daily to reduce the amount of hair your cat ingests, or even shaving the coat once or twice a year. Any reduction in the amount of hair ingested will help. I have many clients who shave their cat down. I have to admit that both the cat and the owner are happy afterward.

    You can also try a hair ball food. I like science diet. I put my cats on it and I think it worked very well.

    There are also oral hair ball medications. These are available over the counter. They help lubricate the hair so that it passes.

    I hope that this helps.

    The most important thing to do is to be sure that your cat doesn’t have a gastrointestinal problem causing excessive grooming, or a skin problem causing an excessive shedding problem. All of these should be discussed with your vet.

    Best of luck.

    Thanks for visiting. And for posting a picture. She’s a cutie.

    Sincerely
    Krista

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Emily Ferris | 6 years ago
Can Cats Get Depressed? Concerned That Our 11 Year Old Cat Is Either Depressed Or…

Can cats get depressed? Concerned that our 11 year old cat is either depressed or sick. He is a big cat, part Maine Coon. He has been on thyroid medication for the past year.1 pill 2x per day. He had his last check up for this a few weeks ago. Normally a social outgoing big cat that loves to eat has been hiding under our son’s bed for 3 days since daughter returned to college. He is not coming to greet me when I come home nor caring to eat or drink. The first day after she left he pooped on the bathroom rug. He did this when she left for school in the fall. The next day he peed on rug in front of my dresser. That is a new behavior. He is like a rag doll when we pick him up. Daughter called. We put her on speaker phone and he perked up when he heard her voice on the phone. After the call he dragged himself to lay under the kitchen table. Then into the next room to use the litter box and is now laying in front of his food bowl. He sniffed the food but is not eating. We don’t know if he is sick or depressed. I called his Vets and was given the next appt which is on Monday. Thank you for any help. He is a well loved cat and our daughter has always spent a lot of time with him

7 Responses

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Emily,

    I do think that cats can get depressed but it sounds more serious than depression in this case.

    Significant and severe changes in behavior, attitude, and the rest of the clinical signs that you have mentioned warrant a trip to the vet, and before Monday.

    Call your vet and explain your concerns and your cats actions, specifically about not eating, the lethargy, and the change in bathroom habits. If they still cannot, or will not see you before Monday then perhaps you should go to the closest emergency clinic or find a vet that can see you ASAP.

    I hope that he is feeling better very soon.

    Best wishes to you both

    Sincerely
    Krista

  2. Emily Ferris Post author

    Thank you for having this site and for your quick response. He saw Dr. McCarthy yesterday. You were right. He needed to be seen as he was very ill. She was wonderful with him and we can’t saw enough kind words for Dr. McCarthy and the care she gave us and our big cat.

  3. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Emily,

    Thank you for the kind words. And I am soo happy that we could help!!

    Best of luck to you both.

    Sincerely

    Krista

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greg stevens | 6 years ago
We Just Brought A Male Kitten Into Our Home That Already Had A Spayed Female…

We just brought a male kitten into our home that already had a spayed female kitten both are approx. the same age (6 mos). The male kitten is apparently terrified oft the female. The female exhibits a playful posture( no hissing or bristling, laying on her back). Is there something we can do to promote interaction and make the male less fearful?

1 Response

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Greg,

    Let your new kitten acclimate to his new home before asking him to be buddies with your female. I usually suggest leaving the new cat in a large carrier with a litter box, and a hidey box so that he can retreat into a safe place. At some point he will be unafraid to come out of the box and play with your kitten. And I am sure that at some point soon they will be best buds.

    Imagine if someone scooped you up and dropped you in a foreign land with some pesky female? Most of us would probably be a little afraid, and a little reluctant to jump in and play with the natives.

    I hope this helps.

    Be patient and gentle and your kitten will come around.

    Sincerely,

    Krista

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Amanda Drake | 6 years ago
My Dog Has Carpal Hyperextension From Trauma. She Has Had X-rays At Two Different…

My dog has carpal hyperextension from trauma. She has had X-rays at two different places and neither know what is wrong. I give her joint supplements but don’t know what else to do. Her extension isn’t the worst but a definite limp probably 30 degrees off what it should be. I came home one day and she had chewed threw our fence and got out. She was hopping on her leg and had 3 small distinct gashes that she still licks to this day even though it has heeled. It’s been about 6 or 7 months now. Surgery is too expensive from what I think and no vet around my area does arthrodesis surgery. She turned 4 in September. If I do nothing, in your opinion, will it get worse? Is there anything other than surgery that I could do? Is she prone to get arthritis at an early age? Someways she limps on it worse than others. I feel terrible and want expert advice.

1 Response

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Amanda,

    I think that there are a few questions to answer, so I am going to do the best I can to try to make this answer make sense.

    First, it is not uncommon for a dog with a history of trauma to have permanent damage to a joint. The carpal (wrist) hyperextension will cause a limp and subsequent joint damage, like osteoarthritis or degenrative joint disease. The joint also usually gets more and more bent, or hyperextended over time due to use and the weight of the body. Keeping your dog lean, with a good body condition score (weight) and well muscled will help. Also, reducing any stressful or strenuous over exertion on the joints will help too..This means trying to minimize running, jumping, etc. The less force your dog puts on that joint the less damage.

    Second, joint supplements might help slow down the joint disease. But, all joint supplements are not equal, so stick with a good respected brand name. I like Dasaquin by Nutramaxx, available over the counter at all big pet supply stores, or your vet.

    Arthrodesis is a surgery that fuses the joint. This will keep the joint from being able to be used and is only done in severe cases to relieve pain or instability. It has fallen out of favor by most boarded surgeons as anything other than a salvage option. So, unless your dog is in significant pain or is unable to use the foot I would not recommend this procedure to anyone without first exploring all other options. It is a painful and radical surgical option, in my opinion.

    The old wound should have healed and should no longer cause your pet a problem. I have seen pets with od wounds that continue to lick even long after the event. The wound/area should be examined by your vet and then it should be treated as either a lick granuloma or chronic wound. For my patients I usually recommend a course of an antibiotic with a steroid, or NSAID, and an e-collar for a few weeks. If your pet can be forced to leave it alone (e-collar) and given some pain relief and an anti-inflammatory they just might leave it alone forever, (or at least a while).

    It is very likely that your pet will have osteoarthritis in that joint as she ages, but in most cases it can be medically managed and dogs adjust well. Just keep her weight and muscle mass optimal and minimize stress on the joint.

    There are veterinarians that focus on sports medicine, joint disease, and even orthopedics, they are invaluable at providing you with all of the options, surgical and conservative and can help you keep her comfortable and functional as she ages.

    I hope that this helps.

    Sincerely,

    Krista

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Mary Jo | 6 years ago
My Cat Goes In The Litter Box And Can’t Urinate. She Keeps On Going To…

My cat goes in the litter box and can’t urinate. She keeps on going to the box. What should I do? I gave her fresh litter. She shares the litter box with another female. She is 19 years old.

1 Response

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  1. Kristen Vance

    It sounds like you need to take your cat to the vet ASAP. She could have anything from a urinary tract infection to something more serious.

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Tracy Payne | 6 years ago
My Dog Is Diabetic And Insulin Dependent. My Question Is Can She Ever Go…

My dog is diabetic and insulin dependent. My question is can she ever go back to not needing insulin and if so, how can I be proactive to help her.

1 Response

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  1. Krista Magnifico

    Hello Tracy,

    This is a tough question without knowing about your dog, age, breed, weight, lifestyle, and how long they have been a diabetic. BUT, in general dogs that are diagnosed and treated successfully with insulin are insulin dependent for the rest of their lives. In some cases the amount of insulin can be decreased as the diet and weight is managed.

    Also, many dogs lose their sight as the diabetes progresses.

    There are many things that you can do to help your dog manage their diabetes and many factors that parents can correct to make acquiring diabetes less likely. In general a high quality age, weight, and breed appropriate food, a healthy lifestyle with lots of exercise, and avoiding excessive weight gain all help your dog avoid this progressively widespread disease.

    It is very important to discuss this disease, your pets overall health, and all aspects of their care with your veterinarian. Diabetics are more susceptible to infection, so monitoring urine and skin is important also.
    Your dog should have their blood sugar checked frequently as you get the diabetes, weight, and dietary changes under control.

    Diabetes is a disease that can be managed with the help of your vet and close monitoring.

    Best of Luck,

    Sincerely,
    Krista